Robin Hood's Stone (Barnsdale)

From International Robin Hood Bibliography
Locality
Coordinate Near 53.612221, -1.233373 ?
Adm. div. West Riding of Yorkshire
Vicinity In Barnsdale
Type Natural feature
Interest Robin Hood name
Status Defunct
First Record 1422
A.k.a. Stone of Robert Hode; Robyn Haddezston
Loading map...
A) Wrangbrook. B) Haver Lands. C) Point along the beck on which the Mickle- or Middle­furlong bounded. D) The Eastfield. E) Sleep Hill. Markers, north to south: 3 x 'Lings' (1842); Lings Lane (defunct); Great Ling Leas (1845); Little Ling Leas (1845); Robin Hood's Well (current position of the well house; the well itself is now under the A1). Shaded area: Skelbrooke.[1]
Looking west from the A1. Robin Hood's Stone probably once sat in this area / Google Earth Street View.
A ride along Sleephill Lane.
A tour of Hampole and Skelbrooke.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2013-07-07. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2021-06-24. Inspired by a suggestion made by David Hepworth.

Among the earliest recorded Robin Hood-related place-names, Robin Hood's Stone in Barnsdale is first mentioned in 1422. Its exact position is not known, but it was situated in or very near Skelbrooke, at the northeast end of Sleep Hill and rather closer to Barnsdale Bar than to Robin Hood's Well. It must have been situated quite close though not adjacent to the Great North Road (A1).

Dobson & Taylor[2] followed Hunter[3] and Walker[4] in thinking that the stone stood on the site of Robin Hood's Well. i.e. that of the well-spring, not that of the well house which was moved a little to the south-east in the early 1960's. Holt[5] argued that the record evidence suggests a locality somewhere to the west of the Great North Road and near Barnsdale Bar. It will be clear from what follows that he was right.

As noted by David Hepworth,[6] it is possible that the "stone of Robert Hode", which is cited as a boundary marker in a record included below (see Records section), was simply named after the owner of the land on which it stood. This landowner may have been a peaceful and law abiding citizen, and his stone may then later have been reinterpreted as a memento of the famous outlaw. No such historical Robert Hood is known to have owned land in the area, but David Hepworth points to the existence of persons surnamed Od in the area in the late 14th century. However, it must be noted that stones or other objects carrying the full name of the owner or occupier of the land in which they sat do not seem at all common in medieval records. The volumes of the English Place-Name Society, especially those published in the 1960's and later, include many field names; despite frequent use of them during several decades, I do not recall seeing more than a few instances. Since Barnsdale was known as one of Robin Hood's haunts already c. 1420, taking Robin Hood's Stone as a name referring to the legendary character seems fairly uncontroversial.

The exact position of the stone of Robert Hode cannot be established from the data in the 1422 record cited below, but it seems clear that all the lands in question lay to the west of the Great North Road, and the stone appears to have been situated east of them, probably not far from the highway. Below follows an analysis of the deed which together with more recent field-name data for the area leads to the conslusion that the stone was situated closer to Barnsdale Bar than to Robin Hood's Well.

Records

1422 - Stone of Robert Hode

[1422:]
Grant1 by John Jubbe of Wrangbrok and Richard Jubbe of Upton to John Pullene of Wrangbrok of a tenement in Wrangbrok built on as it lies between the cottage of the nuns of Hampole on the west and the land of Peter de la Hay on the east, and extends to the beck of the said vill towards the south, together with twelve acres of arable land lying in (fo. 182d) the fields and territory of Wrangbrok, Slepill, and Skelbrok; whereof one acre lies in Haverlands between the land of John Bargan on the north and the land of the monks of Bretton on the south, and a rood of land lies in the same field between the land of the John Jubbe on the west and the land of John Wodward on the east, another half acre lies in Mykilffurland between the land of William Lord on the west and the land of the said monks on the east, one rood lies in the same culture between the land of the said monks on the west and the land of William Shepherd on the east, another half acre lies in Le Estfeld between the land of William Bargan on either side, and one rood lies in the same culture between the land of John Jubbe on the west and the land of the said monks on the east, half a rood lies in the same field between the land of the said monks on either side, one acre [lies] in the same culture between the land of John Haitfeld on the west and the land of John Wodward on the east, half an acre lies in the same culture between the land of William Lord on the west and the land of William Bargan on the east, one acre lies between the land of the said monks on the north and the land of John Adamson on the south, half an acre lies in the same field between the land of William Bargan on the north and the land of the said monks on the south, one acre lies in the same culture between the land of the prioress of Hampall on the north and the land of William Lord on the south, half an acre lies in the same field between the land of the said monks on either side, half an acre lies in Slephill between the land of the said prioress on the west and the land of Richard Slephill on the east and abuts on Lynges of Skelbrok, half an acre lies in the same field between the land of John Adamson on the west and the land of the prioress on the east and abuts on Le Lynges aforesaid, half an acre lies in the same culture between the land of William Lord on the west and the land of Reginald Pullayne on the east and abuts on the aforesaid Lynges and upon the stone of Robert Hode2 towards [p. 106:] the north, an acre (fo.183) lies in the same field between the land of the said prioress on the west and the common land on the east and abuts upon their (the grantors') land towards the north, half an acre lies in the same field between the land of William Calthorn on the south and the land of the lord of Skelbrok on the north and abuts on their (the grantors') land towards the west, half an acre lies in the same field between the land of William Calthorn on the north and the land of the said lord on the north [sic] and abuts on the King's highway towards the east, half an acre lies between the land of William Calthorn on the north and the land of John Janyn on the south and abuts on the same highway to the east.1 To hold and to have to the said John Pulayne for his life, freely, quietly, etc., from the chief lords of that fee, by the services due and accustomed, rendering thence yearly to the lord of Burghwaleis 5d. and to the prior of Bretton 3s. 7d. And after the death of the said John, remainder to John his son and the heirs of his body; and if he shall die without such heir, remainder to the right heirs of John Polayne for ever. Witnesses, John Wentworth of Elmesall, William Lorde of Wrangbrok, Richard de Wrangbrok, and others. Dated at Wrangbrok, Sunday in the feast of Holy Trinity, 1322.2[7]

Allusions

1486 - A Shorte and a Brief Memory

The King himself kepte every Day thus, during both the High Masse and Even Songe in the saide Cathedrall Churche, and that same Weke he remeved unto Notingham [...] The Meir and his Brethren of Notingham in Scarlet Gounes on Horsbake, accompanyed with 6 or 7, with other honest Men al on Horsbake, also receyvede the King a Myle by South of Trent, and bytwene both Briggs the Procession both of the Freres and of the Pariche Chirches receyved the King, and so proceded thorough the Towne to the Castell. From thens the King the next Weke folowinge remevede towarde Yorks, at whos Remeving th Erle of Derby, the Lorde Strannge, Sir William [p. 186:] Stanley, with others, toke ther Leve, and on Saterday came unto Doncaster, wher he abode the Sonday, and hard Masse at the Freres of our Lady, and Even Song in the Parishe Chirche. On the Morne the King remeved to Pomfreyte, accompanyed then and sone after with the Archebishop of York, the Bishop of Ely, Chanceller of England, the Bishop of Excester, Prive Seale; also th Erle of Lyncolln, th Erle of Oxenford, th Erle of Shrewsbury, th Erle of Ryvers, th Erle of Wiltshire, the Viscount Wellis, the Lorde Percy, whiche came to the King at Yorke, the Lorde Grey of Rythyn, the Lorde Grey, the Lorde Fitzwater, Stuarde of the King's Howse, the Lorde Powes, the Lorde Clifforde, the Lorde Fitzhugh, the Lorde Scrop of Upsale, the Lorde Scrop of Bolton, the Lorde La Warre, Lorde Latymer, Lorde Dacre of Gillesland, the Lorde Hastings, and the Lorde Lumley; the Lorde Hussay, Chief Justice of the King's Bench: As also by the following Knights, Sir Richard Egecombe, Countroller of the King's House, Sir Thomas Burgh, Sir John Cheyny, Sir John Grey of Wilton, Sir George Nevell, Sir John Beauchamp, Sir Walter Hungreforde, Sir Robert Taylboys, Sir Robert Willougby, Sir Edward Ponyngs, Sir Humfrey Stanley, Sir John Savage, Sir Davy Owen, Sir Charles of Somersett, Sir Thomas Gokesay, Sir Robert Poynez, Sir John Amelton, Sir Thomas Markenvile, Sir John Savile, Shireff of Yorkshire, Sir Henry Perpoynte, Sir John Babington, Sir Henry Wentworth, Sir Robert Stirley, Sir Thomas Tempeste, Sir Gervas of Clifton, Sir John Turburvile, Sir Edmunde Benyngfelde, Sir John Agrisley, Sir Hugh Persall, Sir Nicholl Langforde, Sir Raulf Bygod, Sir John Nevill of Leversege, Sir William Fitzwilliam, Sir Thoms Fitzwilliam, Sir John Everyngham, Sir Randolf Pigote, Sir Marmaduke Constable, Sir John Walton, Sir Robert Rider, Sir Edmonde Hastings, Sir John Constable of Holdrenesse, Sir Christopher Moresby, Sir Robert Dymok, Sir James Danby, Sir Richarde Hante, Sir John Risley, Sir William Say, and Sir William Tyler, whiche was sent unto the Castell of Midlem. By the Way in Barnesdale, a litill beyonde Robyn Haddezston, th Erle of Northumberland with right a great and noble Company mete and gave his Attendaunce upon the King; that is to say, with 33 Knyghts of his Feedmen, beside Esquiers and Yeomen. Part of those Knyghts Names are ensuen, Sir . . . . . . Multon, Sir Tyme Lorde of Seint Johns, Sir William Geiston, Sir Robert Counstable, Sir Hugh Hastings, Sir William Evers, Sir John Pikering, Sir Robert Plompton, Sir Pers of Medilton, Sir Christofer Warde, Sir William Malary, Sir Thomas Malyver, [p. 187:] Sir William Englishby, Sir James Strangways, Sir Rauf Babthorpe, Sir Thomas Normanville, Sir Martyn of the See, Sir Robert Hilliart, Sir Rauf Crathorn, Sir William Bekwith, Sir Robert Utreyte, Sir Thomas Metham, Sir Richarde Cuonyers, Sir William Darcy, Sir Stephen Hamton, and Sir William A. Stapleston; and so proceded that same Mondaye to Pomnfret, wher his Grace remaynede unto the Thursday next folowing.[8]

Locating the stone

Several years ago, David Hepworth suggested that it might be possible to establish the location of Robert Hood's Stone on the basis of existing maps and records. I was a bit sceptical, and I believe my response was that this would be like trying to solve an incomplete jigsaw puzzle without knowing the number, size and shape of existing and missing pieces. I still think so and therefore must admit that the heading above is rather too optimistic. Still, I have found myself toying with the idea so often that I now feel I should at least make an attempt. I believe the net result is of some use, though my research has not enabled me to pinpoint the Stone. Perhaps what follows may serve as a starting point for others who have access to more records as well as more knowledge of the area and field systems in general. Let us first take a look at the big picture.

Overview of the deed

The deed concerns a tenement in Wrangbrook as well as twelve acres in the 'fields and territories' of:

  • Wrangbrook
  • Sleep Hill
  • Skelbrooke.


It is not clear from the deed itself how this initial tripartition relates to the partition into Wrangbrook, Haverlands, Micklefurlong, Eastfield and Sleep Hill (all in IRHB's modernized spelling) which it subsequently adopts. Here is an overview of the fields and plots referred to in the deed:

  1. Wrangbrook
    1. A tenement with buildings in Wrangbrook, lying between the cottage of the nuns of Hampole on the west and the land of Peter de la Hay on the east, extending to the beck of Wrangbrook to the south
  2. Haverlands
    1. 1 acre in Haverlands between the land of John Bargan on the north and the land of the monks of Bretton on the south
    2. 1 rood between the land of John Jubbe on the west and the land of John Wodward on the east
  3. Micklefurlong
    1. A tenement with buildings in Wrangbrook, lying between the cottage of the nuns of Hampole on the west and the land of Peter de la Hay on the east, extending to the beck of Wrangbrook to the south
    2. 1/2 acre between the land of William Lord on the west and the land of the monks of Bretton on the east
    3. 1 rood between the land of the monks of Bretton on the west and the land of William Shepherd on the east
  4. The Eastfield
    1. 1/2 acre between the land of William Bargan on either side
    2. 1 rood between the land of John Jubbe on the west and the land of the monks of Bretton on the east
    3. 1/2 rood between the lands of the monks of Bretton on either side
    4. 1 acre between the land of John Haitfeld on the west and the land of John Wodward on the east
    5. 1/2 acre between the land of William Lord on the west and the land of William Bargan on the east
    6. 1 acre between the land of the monks of Bretton on the north and the land of John Adamson on the south
    7. 1/2 acre between the land of William Bargan on the north and the land of the monks of Bretton on the south
    8. 1 acre between the land of the prioress of Hampole on the north and the land of William Lord on the south
    9. 1/2 acre between the land of the monks of Bretton on either side
  5. Sleep Hill
    1. ½ acre between the land of the prioress of Hampole on the west and the land of Richard Sleephill on the east, abutting the Lings of Skelbrooke
    2. ½ an acre between the land of John Adamson on the west and the land of the prioress of Hampole on the east, abutting the Lings of Skelbrooke
    3. ½ acre between the land of William Lord on the west and the land of Reginald Pullen on the east, abutting the Lings of Skelbrook and the Stone of Robert Hode on the north
    4. 1 acre between the land of the prioress of Hampole on the west and the common land on the east, abutting the grantors' land to the north
    5. ½ acre between the land of William Calthorn on the south and the land of the lord of Skelbrok to the north, abutting the grantors' land to the west
    6. ½ acre between the land of William Calthorn on the north [?read: south] and the land of the lord of Skelbrok to the north, abutting the King's highway to the east
    7. ½ acre between the land of William Calthorn on the north and the land of John Janyn on the south, abutting the King's highway to the east

Wrangbrook

The deeds in the Chartulary of the Priory of Monkbretton are arranged under some forty vills,[9] of which only Wrangbrook is situated in Barnsdale.[10] The priory's lands in this area clustered around Wrangbrook.[11] Now a small residential area, it was evidently at the time, in relative terms, a somewhat more significant place with the priories of Monkbretton,[11] Hampole,[12] and Nostell among the landholders. There was a manor of sorts,[13] and at least one chapel,[14] a mill and a market.[15] In 1379 there were thirty contributors to the Poll Tax. However, at some point, probably after the Dissolution, Wrangbrook was apparently deserted.[16] One of the grantors and the grantee are said in the deed mentioning Robert Hode's Stone to reside at Wrangbrook, they are described as being 'of Wrangbrook'.[17] The plots transferred by the deed tended to lie in areas fairly close to the village. Wrangbrook is situated just below the letter 'A' on the interactive map shown on this page.

Haverlands

The 1842 tithe award for North Elmsall, which includes the former vill of Wrangbrook, lists four plots of arable named 'Haver Lands'.[18] A comparison of the tithe map and early 25" O.S. maps shows that these plots situated north of Wrangbrook and north of the then railway line[19] extended eastwards from Sheepwalk Lane and about as far north as halfway up the field numbered 125 on the O.S. map.[20] 'Haverlands' were lands where oats was grown – not recorded in OE, 'haver' is probably from ON 'hafri', compare Modern Danish 'havre'[21] – so the fact that these plots are named 'Haver Lands' in the much later tithe award does not in itself afford clear evidence that this area is identical with the pre-Dissolution 'Haverlands'. However, the mention of 'a halffe acre [which] lyes in ye Haverlands and bonds of the by stret of ye est part'.[22] in a 1468 deed makes it clear that at least part of the then Haverlands was situated immediately west of a bystreet, and Sheep Walk Lane is indeed a bystreet, of Wrangbrook Lane.[23] While there could conceivably have been two acres with the same name, 'Haverlands' was the name of an entire field, and for obvious practical reasons it is extremely unlikely that two fields, each consisting of many acres owned or occupied by various individuals or bodies, should have been known under exactly the same name. Thus almost certainly the four plots listed in the tithe award were indeed once part of the field named Haverlands, which would have been situated 300 m or less north of the village of Wrangbrook. The centre point of the four plots listed in the 1842 tithe award is approximately 53.6176,-1.2564. In modern terms this is in the area now occupied by Clayton Avenue/Bell Street in the modern residential area of Shinwell, just below the letter 'B' on the interactive map shown on this page.

Micklefurlong

The 'Micklefurlong' referred to in the deed should almost certainly be identified with the Middlefurlong occurring (in various spellings) in other (mainly earlier) charters. As is the case with the 'Micklefurlong' of the deed mentioning Robert Hood's Stone, the charters locate the Middlefurlong in the field of Wrangbrook or in Wrangbrook tout court and there is mention of acres on both 'Micklefurlong' and Middlefurlong extending to the beck. Thus we hear of 'land in the field of Wrangbruk, [...] an acre in Midelfurland at Pype doles, in length and breadth as it is between Clifurelang and Brokfurlang'; land in Wrangbrook extending 'from the water as far as middilfurlong'; '[...] in Wrangebroc [...] one rood in Midelfurlang'; 'an acre in Wrangebroc lying between the stream and Midilfurlang'.[24] The 'water' or stream here referred to is the beck of Wrangbrook, a '[t]wisted, crooked' or 'wrang' stream meandering past Wrangbrook and nearby Upton,[25] which as it were put the 'brook' in Wrangbrook and the 'Brok' in 'Brokfurlang'. The word furlong in Medieval times referred to 'the length of the furrow in one acre of a ploughed open field' – standardized to 40 rods or 10 chains, c. 201 metres – or to a piece of arable land of (more or less) such length.[26] The letter 'C' on the interactive map on this page indicates a randomly selected point near the beck which formed the south or more likely north border of the Micklefurlong/Middlefurlong.

The Eastfield

A deed dated 1468 refers to 'a nacer [sic] in the est feylde callyd Gowers butts of barnysdale ryg of ye est part and of thomas Lorde of the sowthe part and of ye said prior [of Monk Bretton] of ye north part and west bothe'. This is in 'the felds of Wrangbrok'.[27] The assumption that the Eastfield in Wrangbrook was near the eastern boundary of that village seems uncontroversial. The southern stretch of the road now known as the A639 or Doncaster Road forms the eastern boundary of North Elmsall, the civil parish to which Wrangbrook has belonged at least since the mid-19th century. It was known locally from the 13th century on as Watling Street. Two undated deeds, probably dating from the 13th century, refer to 'one and a half acres next le Rig super hulin' and 'half an acre in the field of Wrangebroc near Watlingstret in Uverfurllanges de Hulin'.[28] It is tempting to identify the 'ryg' (ridge) in 'barnysdale ryg' with 'le Rig super hulin'. There can in any case be no reasonable doubt that the Eastfield was bounded on the east by 'Watlingstret', now Doncaster Road. The only alternative would be to assume that the Eastfield extended further east to the west side of the stretch of the Old North Road that was also known as 'Watling Street' (see Watling Street). However, there is no warrant for this and it would require the additional assumption that the eastern boundary of Wrangbrook or North Elmsall changed from the easternmost Watling Street to the westernmost at some point between the late Medieval period and the mid-19th century. The letter 'D' on the interactive map on this page indicates a randomly selected point probably within the former 'Estfeld'. Although there is no evidence for or against this, it should be noted that the Eastfield could have extended further south, though probably not much further than Wrangbrook Lane and thus Barnsdale Bar, for this would have been in the fields of Sleep Hill.

Sleep Hill

Sleep Hill is the area under which Robert Hood's Stone is listed in the deed. The letter 'E' on the interactive map on this page indicates its approximate location as per early 25" O.S. maps of the area, on which 'Sleep Hill' is indicated at a point about two-thirds of the way from Skelbrook to Wrangbrook along the slightly meandering Sleep Hill Lane (see Maps section below). Several medieval deeds refer to tenements in Sleep Hill. At least one, dating from 1392, suggests the presence of buildings and hence perhaps habitation there. It concerns the grantor's 'messuages, built on and not built on, with all his lands and tenements, rents and services, and all other appurtenances [...] in Wrangbrok and Slephill and the fields thereof'.[29] It has been noted that 'there is a double kink in the present road which could reflect its former course through a small settlement'.[30] The surname of a 'Richard Slephill' figuring in the deed which mentions Robert Hood's Stone is of course evidence of at least one family living there.[31] Traces of settlement in the area in question may well have been partially obliterated by quarrying; early O.S. maps (see Maps section below) indicate that this is the site of the disused 'Sleep Hill Quarry'. There were also lime kilns in the vicinity.[30] Coming from Skelbrooke, Sleep Hill Lane runs past Hill Farm and a house on the north and on the south a farm named or situated at Skelbrooke Hollins (see Maps listed below and Google Maps satellite view).

The name 'Sleep Hill' is first recorded 1175–85, its etymology being 'slippery hill'[32] (i.e. muddy hill). In medieval times there seems to have been a small hamlet in the area where early O.S. maps have 'Sleep Hill'. This hamlet would have been named after the hill itself, which was bounded on the north and east by Wrangbrook Lane and the A1 and was skirted on the south and west by Sleep Hill Lane. From the latter, which throughout its course is hardly ever more than c. 45 metres above sea level, the ground rises steadily towards the north and east, in places reaching a height above sea level of 78 metres. The elevation near Barnsdale Bar is 74 metres.[33] Thus the plots of land listed as being in Sleep Hill were likely located northeast of the lane and not necessarily adjacent to the (putative) small hamlet of Sleep Hill. This is in keeping with the evidence of the deed referring to Robert Hood's Stone.[34]

So where was the stone?

While a good deal of additional evidence to this effect could be cited from the deeds, it is already clear enough from our discussion of the charter mentioning Robert Hood's Stone and the fields and localities named in it that when it came to acquiring land in the Barnsdale area, Wrangbrook was very much the centre of gravity to the monks of Monkbretton. This is also clearly reflected in the deed. If the Stone of Robert Hood was identical with or situated adjacent to Robin Hood's Well, as suggested by several historians (see the introduction above), it and adjacent plots would be further to the south of Wrangbrook than any other identifiable locality mentioned in the deed. The fact that the stone figures in a list of plots in Sleep Hill makes it almost certain that this was not the case. The evidence instead points to a location west of, but probably not very far from, Barnsdale Bar, i.e. at some point about 1.7 km north-northwest of the original location of Robin Hood's Well. One of the plots in Sleep Hill (item E f in the list above) abutted on the King's highway, which in the context can only be either the road now known as Doncaster Road or the A1. It will be remembered that the deed refers initially to lands in Wrangbrook, Sleep Hill, and Skelbrooke. The suggested area could be said to be in both Sleep Hill and Skelbrooke. No lands other than those the deed lists under Sleep Hill seem to be situated in Skelbrooke.

The tithe award for Skelbrook (1845) lists two adjacent plots of arable named, respectively, Great and Little Ling Leys.[35] Their approximate centre point coordinates are, for Great Ling Leas: 53.616600,-1.232900, and for Little Ling Leas: 53.615229,-1.232568 (see the interactive map on this page). This is at the southwest corner of Wrangbrook Lane (A6201) and the A1. The plots did not, according to the tithe map, extend all the way east to the A1, for a narrow belt of grass land, named 'Common Side'[36] along the A1 separated the Lings from the road. See further the 25" maps of the area. The deed implies that the plot in which Robert Hood's Stone sat was situated north of one of the plots transferred by the deed and that the latter abutted on the 'Lynges of Skelbrok' to the south. This means that the Ling Leas should probably not be identfied with the 'Lynges of Skelbrok', for the northernmost Ling Lea is bounded on the north by Wrangbrook Lane, while there are plots of land immediately north of the 'Lynges of Skelbrok' according to deed. The 'Lynges' can only be identified with the Ling Leas if it is assumed that Wrangbrook Lane did not yet exist in 1422, which seems unlikely. Yet if the Ling Leas are not to be identified with the 'Lynges of Skelbrok', it nonetheless is interesting that on the strength of 19th-century field name evidence the area southwest of Barnsdale Bar was in part covered by heather, i.e. ling. The medieval 'Lynges of Skelbrok' may well have been situated in this vicinity. Three adjacent areas along Doncaster Road are listed with the name 'Lings' in the 1842 tithe award for North Elmsall, but this is slightly north of Wrangbrook Lane and so hardly in Sleep Hill/Skel­brooke.[37]

Since the Stone of Robert Hood was known to travellers on the Great North Road (see 1486 allusion), it cannot have been very far from the road. On the other hand we note that at least one plot separated that on which the stone sat from the highway. In order to put Robin Hood's Stone on the map we have chosen an arbitrary coordinate in the area, not too close to the road but somewhat south of the Ling Leas: 53.612221,-1.233373. This suggestion agrees well with what Holt found.[38]

Gazetteers

Printed sources

MS sources

  • Tithe award for North Elmsall, Piece 43, Sub-Piece 145, Image 017, #230, #237-39, #280-82, at TheGenealogist (£)
    • tithe map, Piece 43, Sub-Piece 145, Sub-Image 001, #230, #237-39, #280-82, at TheGenealogist (£)
  • Tithe award for Skelbrooke, Piece 43, Sub-Piece 357, Image 081, plots #8-9, at TheGenealogist (£)
    • Tithe award for Skelbrooke, Piece 43, Sub-Piece 357, Sub-Image 001, plots #8-9, at TheGenealogist (£).

Maps


Discussion

Background

Notes

  1. Roughly based on boundary coordinates provided by TheGenealogist.
  2. Dobson, R. B., ed.; Taylor, J., ed. Rymes of Robyn Hood: an Introduction to the English Outlaw (London, 1976), pp. 23-24.
  3. Hunter, Joseph. The Great Hero of the Ancient Minstrelsy of England, "Robin Hood." His Period, Real Character, etc. investigated and perhaps ascertained (Critical and Historical Tracts, No. 4) (London, 1852), pp. 60-61.
  4. Walker, J. W., ed., Abstracts of the Chartularies of the Priory of Monkbretton (Yorkshire Archæological Society, Record Series, vol. LXVI) (1924), p. 105 n. 2.
  5. Holt, J.C. Robin Hood (London, 1982), pp. 102-103; Holt, J.C. Robin Hood. Revised and enlarged edition (London, 1989), pp. 106-107. Also see Crook, David. Robin Hood: Legend and Reality (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2020), pp. 136-37.
  6. Hepworth, David. 'Life versus Fiction: A Consideration of Real Northern Outlaws and their Background versus the Early Ballads of Robin Hood' (unpublished paper from the Third Biannual Robin Hood Conference at York, 2003). Unpublished paper.
  7. Walker, John William, ed., Abstracts of the Chartularies of the Priory of Monkbretton. Reprinted (Cambridge Library Collection) (Cambridge, 2013), pp. 105-106.
  8. Leland, John; Hearne, Thomas, ed. J. Lelandi Antiquarii de Rebus Britannicis Collectanea. (Londini, 1770), vol. IV, pp. 185-87.
  9. Walker, J. W., ed., Abstracts of the Chartularies of the Priory of Monkbretton (Yorkshire Archæological Society, Record Series, vol. LXVI) (1924), pp. 1-4.
  10. For much of what follows on Wrangbrook, see Heritage Gateway: West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service: Wrangbrook, North Elmsall unless another source is cited.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Walker, op. cit., pp. 9, 11, 14, 15, 16, 48, 49, 102-109, 185-88, 209-10, 213.
  12. Walker, op. cit., pp. 105, 106, 185.
  13. See Heritage Gateway as above and note 'Manor Farm on 25" O.S. map Yorkshire CCLXIV.5 (1906; rev. 1904).
  14. Walker, op. cit., p. 185.
  15. Walker, op. cit., p. 187.
  16. Heritage Gateway: West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service: Human burial, Barnsdale Way.
  17. Walker, op. cit., p. 105.
  18. Tithe award for North Elmsall, Piece 43, Sub-Piece 145, Image 017, #230, #237-39, at TheGenealogist (£); tithe map, Piece 43, Sub-Piece 145, Sub-Image 001, at TheGenealogist (£).
  19. See for instance Railway Ramblers: H&BR Wrangbrook JN – Cudworth Station (9 miles).
  20. 25" O.S. map Yorkshire CCLXIV.6 (1893; surveyed 1891).
  21. Also see Middle English Dictionary, hā̆ver n.(2).
  22. Walker, op. cit., p. 107.
  23. References to 'Haulandes' or similar probably also concern this field. For other charters referring to Haverland/Haulandes, see Walker, op. cit., pp. 185, 186; Farrer, William, ed. Early Yorkshire Charters, being a Collection of Documents anterior to the Thirteenth Century made from the Public Records, Monasti Chartularies, Roger Dodsworth's Manuscripts and Other Available Sources. Vol. III (Yorkshire Archæological Society, Record series, Extra series) (Edinburgh, 1916), p. 377.
  24. Walker, op.cit., pp. 103, 185; Farrer, op.cit., pp. 177-78.
  25. English Place-Name Society: Survey of English Place-Names: Wrangbrook; 25" O.S. map Yorkshire CCLXIV.5 (1906; rev. 1904) (georeferenced).
  26. Wikipedia: Furlong.
  27. Walker, op. cit., p. 107. First brackets IRHB's, second Walker's.
  28. Walker, op. cit., p. 185.
  29. Walker, op. cit., p. 109; also see there pp. 107, 108.
  30. 30.0 30.1 Heritage Gateway: Sleep Hill, settlement, lime kilns, North Elmsall.
  31. See Farrer, op.cit., p. 231 and 260 n. 3 for a William de Slepehill.
  32. English Place-Name Society: Survey of English Place-Names: Wrangbrook.
  33. Google Maps satellite view can be set to indicate the height at the point under the mouse cursor.
  34. See Farrer, op. cit., pp. 230, 231, 260 for other charters mentioning Sleep Hill.
  35. Piece 43, Sub-Piece 357, Image 081, plots #8-9, at TheGenealogist; tithe map: Piece 43, Sub-Piece 357, Sub-Image 001, plots #8-9, at TheGenealogist.
  36. Plot #10 in the tithe award.
  37. Piece 43, Sub-Piece 145, Image 014 : Tithe award for North Elmsall: #280-82: Lings, at TheGenealogist; tithe map: Piece 43, Sub-Piece 145, Sub-Image 001, #280-82, at TheGenealogist.
  38. Holt, J.C. Robin Hood (London, 1982), pp. 102-103; Holt, J.C. Robin Hood. Revised and enlarged edition (London, 1989), pp. 106-107. Also see Crook, David. Robin Hood: Legend and Reality (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2020), pp. 117, 131 (map), 136-37.

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