Jump to: navigation, search

1824 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

Record
Date 1824
Topic Man who assaulted watchman is caught on corner of Robin Hood Court
Loading map...
Site of Robin Hood Court, Shoe Lane, Holborn.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-06-17. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-07-28.

Record

[3 Jun. 1824:]
Q. On recovering yourself, what did you do - A. I asked him for mercy - he told me to sit on the block, and if I moved, it would be worse for me. He ran away - I followed him, out, and sprung my rattle, and kept him in sight till he turned the corner of Stonecutter-street. Four or five more watchmen came to my assistance, and in four or five minutes he was brought to me - I knew him again - I caught sight of him as soon as I turned the corner of Stonecutter-street - nobody but him was running before me - he was stopped just by Robin-hood-court, Shoe-lane, by a watchman of St. Andrew's. I examined the fishmonger's shop, and found the crow-bar there. I felt the effects of my wound in about an hour, and went to the hospital about six o'clock that morning. I was ordered to bed, and my head dressed - I felt great inconvenience from it.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. At what time did it happen - A. At a quarter or twenty minutes before five o'clock - he shut the door upon me - they were both in the shop when the door was shut - I was alarmed very much, but did not lose my recollection - there was no light there - it was daylight; the back door was open, and I had plenty of light; I saw him take the crow-bar off the floor.

Q. Do you mean to state that you were possessed of your senses sufficiently to know the manner in which he struck you - A. Yes; he struck me with one hand, and the sharp end of the crow-bar turned towards my head - the dresser of the hospital saw me about five minutes after I got there; I attended before the Alderman the second day after it happened.

COURT. Q. We understood you to say that you saw two men, one ran away and the other stopped in - A. Yes, my Lord - he went away directly after the door was shut; I and the prisoner were then left alone; I saw no marks of violence on the door; the lock had been sprung; the crow-bar did not appear to me to have been used to get in with.

CHARLES SILVESTER. I am watchman of St. Bride's; I was on duty on Sunday morning, the 11th of April; about five o'clock I heard Fishburn's rattle spring; my box faces the centre of the market near Harp-alley - I can see this shop by moving a yard or two - I saw Fishburn pursuing the prisoner, who ran straightup the market towards me; I pursued him into Shoe-lane, where he was stopped by a watchman - I lost sight of him as he turned the corner of Stonecutter-street, and on turning the corner myself, I saw the watchman trying to stop him; he was still running, but the watchman struck at him, and he got away; but he struck him again and was taken - nobody but him and the prosecutor were running in a direction from the shop; I have no doubt of his person; there is a linendrapers shop next door to the fishmongers.

JOHN CLARK. I am a watchman of St. Andrew's. I was upon duty in Shoe-lane at five o'clock, and heard a rattle spring - I saw the prisoner running, and two or three watchmen after him, calling Stop him! - he came directly towards me, out of Stonecutter-street, nearly out of breath. I called out "Stop, or else down you go;" he used some bad language, and tried to brush by me - I struck him on the shoulder with my staff - he got about twenty yards further, when I gave him another blow and secured him, at the corner of Robin-hood-court - I did not lose sight of him from the time I first saw him - Fishburn's face was covered with blood - he said "That is the man who tried to take my life."[1]

Source notes

IRHB has silently regularized the use of spaces before punctuation marks in the quotation and corrected the HTML text at Proceedings of the Old Bailey from the PDF of the original printed edition.

Lists

Sources

Also see

Notes