Difference between revisions of "Eastwood Rocks (Ashover)"

From International Robin Hood Bibliography
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__NOTOC__{{PlaceNamesItemTop|Lat=53.164163|Lon=-1.462814|AdministrativeDivision=Derbyshire|Vicinity=In Eastwood; ''c.'' 340 m N of Eastwood Lane; midway between Farhill and Littlemoor|Type=Natural feature|Interest=Local tradition|Status=Defunct|Demonym=English|Riding=|GreaterLondon=|Year=1804|Aka=|Century=|Cluster1=|Cluster2=|Cluster3=|Image=standard_785.jpg|Postcards=|ExtraCat1=Places connected by bowshot|ExtraCat2=|ExtraCat3=|ExtraCat4=|ExtraCat5=|ExtraLink1=Robin Hood's Stride (Harthill)|ExtraLink2=|ExtraLink3=|ExtraLink4=|ExtraLink5=|ExtraLinkName1=|ExtraLinkName2=|ExtraLinkName3=|ExtraLinkName4=|ExtraLinkName5=|GeopointPrefix=|GeopointSuffix=<ref>Coordinate cf. [https://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/crag.php?id=918#maps UKC Logbook: Eastwood Rocks]</ref>|StatusSuffix=?|DatePrefix=|DateSuffix=?}}
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__NOTOC__{{PlaceNamesItemTop|Lat=53.164163|Lon=-1.462814|AdministrativeDivision=Derbyshire|Vicinity=In Eastwood; ''c.'' 340 m N of Eastwood Lane; midway between Farhill and Littlemoor|Type=Natural feature|Interest=Local tradition|Status=Defunct|Demonym=English|Riding=|GreaterLondon=|Year=1804|Aka=|Century=|Cluster1=Ashover|Cluster2=|Cluster3=|Image=standard_785.jpg|Postcards=|ExtraCat1=Places connected by bowshot|ExtraCat2=|ExtraCat3=|ExtraCat4=|ExtraCat5=|ExtraLink1=Robin Hood's Stride (Harthill)|ExtraLink2=|ExtraLink3=|ExtraLink4=|ExtraLink5=|ExtraLinkName1=|ExtraLinkName2=|ExtraLinkName3=|ExtraLinkName4=|ExtraLinkName5=|GeopointPrefix=|GeopointSuffix=<ref>Coordinate cf. [https://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/crag.php?id=918#maps UKC Logbook: Eastwood Rocks]</ref>|StatusSuffix=?|DatePrefix=|DateSuffix=?}}
 
{{#display_map:{{#var:Coords}}~{{#replace:{{PAGENAME}}|&#39;|'}}|width=34%|enablefullscreen=yes}}<div class="pnMapLegend">Eastwood Rocks, Ashover</div>
 
{{#display_map:{{#var:Coords}}~{{#replace:{{PAGENAME}}|&#39;|'}}|width=34%|enablefullscreen=yes}}<div class="pnMapLegend">Eastwood Rocks, Ashover</div>
 
[[File:{{#var:Image}}|thumb|right|500px|Eastwood Rocks, Ashover / [https://peakboulderingimages.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/photo/image/785/standard_785.png Stuart Brooks, at Peak District Bouldering.]]]<div class="no-img">
 
[[File:{{#var:Image}}|thumb|right|500px|Eastwood Rocks, Ashover / [https://peakboulderingimages.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/photo/image/785/standard_785.png Stuart Brooks, at Peak District Bouldering.]]]<div class="no-img">
<p id="byline">By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-09-29. Revised by {{#realname:{{REVISIONUSER}}}}, {{REVISIONYEAR}}-{{REVISIONMONTH}}-{{REVISIONDAY2}}.</p><p>A local tradition connected Eastwood Rocks near Ashover, Chesterfield, with Robin Hood's Stride, about 13.5 km to the west. It was said that Robin Hood and Little John had shot an arrow from Eastwood Rocks to Robin Hood's Stride near Harthill. Little John hit the target, but Robin Hood's arrow fell in the valley below the rocks.</p>
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<p id="byline">By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-09-29. Revised by {{#realname:{{REVISIONUSER}}}}, {{REVISIONYEAR}}-{{REVISIONMONTH}}-{{REVISIONDAY2}}. Includes information from IRHB user Chris.</p><p>A local tradition connected Eastwood Rocks near Ashover, Chesterfield, with Robin Hood's Stride, about 13.5 km to the west. It was said that Robin Hood and Little John had shot an arrow from Eastwood Rocks to Robin Hood's Stride near Harthill. Little John hit the target, but Robin Hood's arrow fell in the valley below the rocks.</p>
<p>For this tradition see the allusion cited below, which should possibly be dated 1794 rather than 1804.<ref>As discussed [[1804 - Unknown - Note on drawing of Robin Hood's Stride|on the page on the allusion.]]</ref> The status "Defunct?" indicated in the info box refers to the local tradition rather than the rocks or their name.</p>
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<p>For this tradition see the allusion cited below, which should possibly be dated 1794 rather than 1804.<ref>As discussed [[1804 - Unknown - Note on drawing of Robin Hood's Stride|on the page on the allusion.]]</ref> The status "Defunct?" indicated in the info box refers to the local tradition rather than the rocks or their name. As suggested by an IRHB user named Chris, [[Robin Hood's Mark (Ashover)|Robin Hood's Mark]], a mere 2 km away would seems a more likely target. Was the tradition transferred from there to Robin Hood's Stride? Or did someone without firsthand knowledge of Ashover confuse the Stride and the Mark?</p>
  
 
Every now and then a climber feels the urge to test his skills on these gritstone rocks (see Background below), but they stand on private land and the farmer who owns it is apparently not too happy with the trespassing.{{PlaceNamesItemAllusionsAndRecords}}
 
Every now and then a climber feels the urge to test his skills on these gritstone rocks (see Background below), but they stand on private land and the farmer who owns it is apparently not too happy with the trespassing.{{PlaceNamesItemAllusionsAndRecords}}

Latest revision as of 12:56, 16 June 2021

Locality
Coordinate 53.164163, -1.462814[1]
Adm. div. Derbyshire
Vicinity In Eastwood; c. 340 m N of Eastwood Lane; midway between Farhill and Littlemoor
Type Natural feature
Interest Local tradition
Status Defunct?
First Record 1804?
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Eastwood Rocks, Ashover

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-09-29. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2021-06-16. Includes information from IRHB user Chris.

A local tradition connected Eastwood Rocks near Ashover, Chesterfield, with Robin Hood's Stride, about 13.5 km to the west. It was said that Robin Hood and Little John had shot an arrow from Eastwood Rocks to Robin Hood's Stride near Harthill. Little John hit the target, but Robin Hood's arrow fell in the valley below the rocks.

For this tradition see the allusion cited below, which should possibly be dated 1794 rather than 1804.[2] The status "Defunct?" indicated in the info box refers to the local tradition rather than the rocks or their name. As suggested by an IRHB user named Chris, Robin Hood's Mark, a mere 2 km away would seems a more likely target. Was the tradition transferred from there to Robin Hood's Stride? Or did someone without firsthand knowledge of Ashover confuse the Stride and the Mark?

Every now and then a climber feels the urge to test his skills on these gritstone rocks (see Background below), but they stand on private land and the farmer who owns it is apparently not too happy with the trespassing.

Allusions

1804 - Unknown - Note on drawing of Robin Hood's Stride

The tradition of the neighbourhood is, that Robin Hood and Little John stood upon Eastwood Rocks, about 1½ miles off, and shot at this stone [i.e. Robin Hood's Stride, Harthill]:—Little John's hit it, but Robin Hood's fell short of it in the valley below.[3]

Gazetteers

Sources

Maps

Background

Also see


Notes