Jump to: navigation, search

Robin Hood's Cave (Rock Cemetery, Nottingham)

Locality
Coordinates 52.965555555556, -1.1533333333333
Adm. div. Nottinghamshire
Vicinity On NE edge of Rock Cemetery, Nottingham; on west side of Mansfield Road (A60)
Type Miscellaneous
Interest Robin Hood name
Status Defunct
First Record 1892
A.k.a. Robin Hood's Caves; Robin Hood's Mammoth Cave; Robin Hood's Stables
Loading map...
Robin Hood's Caves.
Robin Hood's Cave / Geograph.
Anonymous. Robin Hood's Caves, Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. '93/5'. [s.n]: [s.l.], [s.d.] Monochrome picture postcard. 87 x 135 mm.
Anonymous. Robin Hood's Caves, Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. [s.n]: [s.l.], [s.d.] Monochrome picture postcard. 90 x 138 mm.
Anonymous. Nottingham. Robin Hood's Caves. [s.n]: [s.l.], [s.d.] Col. picture postcard. 89 x 140 mm.
Anonymous. Robin Hood Caves Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. [s.n]: [s.l.], [s.d.] Col. picture postcard. 89 x 139 mm.
Anonymous. Robin Hood's Caves, Nottingham. [s.n]: [s.l.], [s.d.] Col. picture postcard. 87 x 137 mm.
Anonymous. Robin Hood's Cave, Nottingham. [s.n]: [s.l.], [s.d.] Col. picture postcard. 87 x 137 mm.
Painting by Thomas Moore, c. 1848, of the area known as the Ropewalk before Rock Cemetery was established / [The Paul Nix Collection The Paul Nix Collection.]


By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2017-01-13. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2017-01-18.

Robin Hood's Cave is located at the eastern perimeter of Rock Cemetery in Nottingham, immediately west of Mansfield Road (A60). In the mid-19th century, as the area was being cleared and excavated to establish the cemetery, local clergyman George Oliver – in this very much a child of his times – was convinced that several of the caves found there, including Robin Hood's Cave, were part of an ancient druid temple.[1] Reality has a habit of being prosaic. The caves were in fact a by-product of mining, during the 18th century and earlier, for sandstone which was ground to yield sand.[2] Until the cemetery was created, the area where Robin Hood's Cave is located was known as the Ropewalk as rope was made here (see Thomas Moore's painting reproduced elsewhere on this page).

In 1892, when the sand mining was long forgotten, the cave and part of the cave system with which it is connected were advertised as "Robin Hood's Mammoth Cave", "one of the grandest sights in England".[3] At present I do not know if the cave had been connected with, or named after, Robin Hood before that date. It is noted in a recent article by a local historian that the cave "was once known as 'Robin Hood’s Cave or Stables'", and we may conclude, therefore, that the name is now defunct. As can be seen on the present page, the cave was a popular subject for photographic postcards during the turn of the 20th century.

Gazetteers

Sources

Maps

Background

Also see

Notes

  1. Nottingham Hidden History Team: Rev. George Oliver and Nottingham’s Druid Temple by Frank E. Earp.
  2. Waltham, Tony. 'The Sand Mines of Nottingham', Bulletin of the Peak District Mines Historical Society, vol. 12 (1994), pp. 1-11.
  3. Waltham, Tony. 'The Sand Mines of Nottingham', Bulletin of the Peak District Mines Historical Society, vol. 12 (1994), pp. 1-11, see p. 3.