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Records 1901-2000 (texts)

{"pagename":"1902 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey","alcent":20,"aldecade":1901,"alyear":1902},{"pagename":"1907 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)","alcent":20,"aldecade":1901,"alyear":1907},{"pagename":"1909 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey","alcent":20,"aldecade":1901,"alyear":1909},{"pagename":"1910 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey","alcent":20,"aldecade":1911,"alyear":1910},{"pagename":"1911 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)","alcent":20,"aldecade":1911,"alyear":1911},{"pagename":"1911 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)","alcent":20,"aldecade":1911,"alyear":1911},

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2014-05-04. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-11-01.

The following 6 records are found for the period 1901-2000:

1902 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey

[2 Jun. 1902:]
JAMES MURRAY FLEMING. I am secretary to the Bazaar, Exchange and Mart newspaper, 170, Strand—I produce two instructions for advertisements in that paper (Read): "Lady's Beeston Cycle, 55s. 6d., part exchange, Wilson, 8, Robin Hood Lane, Poplar, E." and "Gentleman's Rover Pneumatic, 25s. 6d., grand order, Burton, 80, Baalam Street, Plaistow, E."—I also produce both those advertisements as they appeared in the Bazaar, Exchange, and Mart on April 4th.

WILLIAM GEORGE WELTON (Warder). I served a copy of this Notice to Produce on Robert Rix on May 20th.

ELLEN ROBINSON (Wardress). I served a copy of this Notice to Produce upon Emily Rix on May 20th.

WILLIAM CRIDLAND (Detective Sergeant K.) I served a copy of this Notice to Produce upon John Morris on May 20th.

NELLIE CARVER. I am single and live at 13, College Street, Swindon, Wilts—I saw the advertisement relating to a lady's cycle in the Bazaar, Exchange and Mart, and I wrote in reply stating that I had a bearskin rug value £5, which I would exchange for that bicycle if it was in good condition—I received this reply (Produced), stating that the bicycle was in first class condition and that my rug should be returned if I was not satisfied with the bicycle—believing the writer to be a lady named Wilson, and that she had a bicycle to sell, I sent this rug (Produced) and received this reply, stating that the writer was very disappointed with it, that it was not worth £1, but that if I would send a sovereign she would send the bicycle or return the rug—I then sent a money order for £1 post dated ten days—I received the money order back with a letter saying the machine would only be sent on receipt of cash—I then wrote and asked for the return of my rug at once, and in the meantime informed the police—I never received my rug back and heard nothing more of it until I heard from the police.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. I sent my rug on April 7th.

ANNIE FIELD HOLDEN. I am wife of Albert Holden, of Blackburn, Lancashire—on April 4th I saw the advertisement (Produced) relating to a lady's bicycle, and I wrote offering £1 in cash and a violin and bow in case in exchange for the bicycle, and I received a reply stating that if I sent £1 and the violin and bow, the machine would be sent off at once—on April 10th I sent £1 and the violin and bow in case to Mrs. Wilson, 8, Robin Hood Lane—those are the violin and bow and case (Produced)—I received this letter (Produced) acknowledging the receipt of the violin and stating that the machine would be sent on the following Monday or Tuesday—not having received the machine I wrote again to Mrs. Wilson, but received no reply, and I then informed the police.

FRANCIS KEAST. I live at 445, Battersea Park Road—on April 4th I saw the advertisement relating to a gentleman's bicycle in the Exchange and Mart newspaper, and I wrote offering an air gun and a watch in exchange—I received this letter stating that if I sent them on, the machine would be sent on at once—these (Produced) are the articles I sent believing I should get the machine in exchange—the watch was marked "Glass, with care"—I received this letter stating that the articles were to hand and that the machine would be sent on the following Saturday evening—not having received the machine I wrote a letter to the address given in the advertisement, and it was returned through the post marked "Gone away."

ISABELLA BIGG. I live at 10, Robin Hood Lane, Poplar, and am the wife of Henry Edgar Bigg—my mother lives at No. 8, Robin Hood Lane, and keeps a tobacco and newspaper shop there, and I help her in the business—the female prisoner came into the shop about the end of February and asked if I would receive letters and parcels for which she would pay 1d. for each letter and 2d. for each parcel, and I agreed to do so—she gave the name of Wilson—I remember a parcel coming between February 8th and 10th, with the ends open, and I saw that it contained something similar to the rug produced—it was addressed to Mrs. Wilson—the female prisoner called for it and I gave it to her—I also remember another parcel coming about the same time containing the violin, bow and case produced also a registered letter, both addressed to Mrs. Wilson, and I handed them to the female prisoner when she called—she paid me 2d. each for the parcels and 1d. for the letter, together with the receipt (Produced) for the registered letter, and took them away—she always came alone except that she carried a baby.[1]

1907 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[23 Oct. 1876:]
ELLEN LAWRENCE, wife of Joseph Lawrence, 60, Albert Street, Barnsbury Road, printer. I have known the deceased girl eight or 10 years, and that she for some time lived an immoral life as her means of livelihood. She lived in Bidborough Street, 12, Manchester Street, 15 months ago; 30, Liverpool Street, Gower Place, College Street, Judd Street, and then with Shaw at 29, St. Paul's Road. I know prisoner well by sight. I first saw him when Dimmock lived in Manchester Street in the "Pindar of Wakefield" public-house, Gray's Inn Road, in conversation with Dimmock—they seemed very good friends. I have also seen them, both there separately. Frederick Street, in which the prisoner lives, is very near the "Pindar of Wakefield." I have not seen them together since until the Friday before the murder, September 6, in the "Rising Sun." At about 8.30 p.m Dimmock came into the bar where I was having a drink with Mrs. Smith. Prisoner came in and teemed on friendly terms with Dimmock. On Monday Smith and I when there at eight p.m. We were going to the Euston Music Hall for the second house at nine p.m. Prisoner came in. He stood Mrs. Smith and me a drink. We spoke to him, and he asked if we would have something to drink. He asked if we had seen Dimmock he called her "Phyllis." She has been known by that name ever since sue came to London. Mrs. Smith passed a jovial remark to him, "Don't tell Phyllis we have had a drink with you—she might be jealous." Shortly after Dimmock came in. said "Good evening" to us, and passed direct over to prisoner. She put a penny in the gramophone which prisoner gave her. They staved a little while and came out at the same time as we did. She said they were going to the Ho'born Empire; they crossed the road and got into a bus. Dimmock seemed nervous, as if she did not want to go with prisoner—

[...]

JOHN WILLIAM CRABTREE. I have no fixed abode at present. I was living at 1, Bidborough Street about May twelvemonth. I purchased the lease of that house. Previous to my going there Phyllis Dimmock stayed there as well as alter. The other people were respectable people. While living there I have seen prisoner there. I once say him coming down from the first floor towards the cellar; in fact, I saw him on several occasions. One night as I opened the door I met Wood in the passage and he passed down into my kitchen, and while I was putting my bicycle away Dimmock followed him down and got hold of his arm and wanted something from him. What the something was I do not know. I said, "What it all this bother about?" Dimmock says, "Give it to me." With that prisoner said, "Oh, she is only a common prostitute, and you know so." With that he went through my door up the area steps. He used to stop there on several occasions. On another occasion I was called up into the bedroom early in the morning, and Phyllis was in a nude condition except for a sheet thrown over her shoulders. This would be before seven in the morning; about half-past six. Dimmock asked me when I wet going out would I take a silver cigarette case and pawn it for her. Wood was there in bed. She gave me the case, and I said to Wood, "Is this yours?" He said, "Yes." They then asked me to hand it back and never mind pawning it, and I gave it to Wood. Wood remained in bed. I afterwards went to Manchester Street, and Dim mock also lived there. That would be about the latter end of June last year. On the Saturday after we moved I saw prisoner there. On a subsequent occasion I saw Wood at the corner of Gray's Inn Road and Manchester Street, and saw him again in the "Pindar of Wakefield." One day prisoner came to Manchester Street while Dimmock was at Portsmouth, and asked for her. I told him she was not in, and he asked me when I expected her. I did not know. When she came back he came to the house again. I was convicted for keeping a brothel at Manchester Street in July last year and sentenced to three months' imprisonment. I came out on May 24, as I had had a ticket to serve. After that I went to 30a, Argyll Square. In May this year I was sentenced again for keyring that house at a brothel, getting four months. The sentence expired about ten days ago.

[...]

Prisoner. No. I made her acquaintance in the "Rising Sun" on the Friday mentioned in my statement, which is perfectly true. I have heard the evidence of the man Crabtree. It is utterly false; in fact, it is dastardly. I hope God will destroy me this minute if I ever knew Crabtree or have ever been in his house. I live within a stone's throw of the "Rising Sun." I knew Ruby Young when she was living in Liverpool Street, but I did not know that Phyllis Dimmock lived nearly opposite. On the Friday night deceased asked me fore penny for the gramophone, and I gave her one. I paid for drinks. Later a boy offered some postcards for sale. They were of a very common, inartistic kind. I produced some more artistic cards from my pocket, and Dimmock chose the card which has been produced. She said she collected them, and asked me if I would send it to her, and write something pleasing on it to give it interest. I signed the card with the name "Alice" at her request. She said that was the name of a friend. I saw her again the following night in Great College Street, as I was on my way to the Gas Company's offices in Camden Road. On the Sunday night I did not see her, but on the Monday night I saw her for some tune in the "Rising Sun." The man Roberts was there. Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Lawrence were there also. We had drinks and were all very friendly. I did not take Dimmock to the Holbom Music Hail that night. I had a sketch book, and she amused herself looking through it She had some intelligence, and I may say that appealed to me. I did not hear Dimmock say that we bad spent the evening in the "Adam and Eve" public-house. I have never seen Dimmock in the "Pindar of Wakefield." It would be some time after 11 that I left the "Rising Sun" on the Monday night. She called my attention on the Saturday night to the fact that I had not sent the postcard. I posted it on the Sunday night, I think, in the pillar box in Museum Street, alter I had left my brother's place. On the Tuesday night I was not in the "Rising Sun" at all. I was on my way to Red Lion Street to see about some ink for a style pen when I met my brother in Theobald's Road. After we had been to the public library and to the barber's, I accompanied him home and had supper, and he afterwards came back with me to Frederick Street to see father. I did not go out again after that. On the following evening, September 11, I was in the "Eagle" public-house with Dimmock, whom I met in the Camden Road. Lambert came in, and I introduced her to him as a "merry girl friend." I only knew her a a Phyllis, and did not mention her name. I addressed the postcard to "Mrs. B. Shaw" at her dictation.

[...]

Cross-examined. Yesterday was the first time I made an admission in public that I was in Dimmock's company on September 11—I have nor spoken in public before. I did not mention it to Ruby Young nor to my brothers Charles and James, nor to Tinkham. I had nothing to fear from publicity being given to my association with her. Naturally it looked very bad that I was so late in her company the night she was killed. The "Rising Sun" postcard is on its face a letter of assignation. It is written by me signed in the name of "Alice" and addressed to the woman in the house in which she lived and where she was killed. It was hardly an appointment; there was no seriousness attached to it. Prior to September 6 I had never seen Phyllis Dimmock in my life. I did not say on Friday, September 6, to Smith, "Have you seen Phyllis?"—that is a mistake. I did not beckon to Dimmock. The postcard was lightly penciled out in the "Rising Sun" on my sketch-book, while sitting by her side, and retained by me. I had no fixed intention of posting it. I intended that I might look in by the way at the "Rising Sun." I was there about an hour on Friday. I went there about 10 p.m. and left about 12; I was in Dimmock's company practically all that time. I did not go to the "Rising Sun" on Saturday, but met Dimmock quite accidentally in Great College Street. I was in the "Eagle" with her that evening. I have been in the "Eagle" about once before. I do not use the "Pindar of Wakefield." The only occasion I recollect being there was before Christmas, 1906, with Tinkham. I have been in the "Adam and Eve," and was there for about an hour with diseased on the Saturday. I did not see her on the Sunday, but late that night I posted the "Rising Sun" postcard. I cannot recall when I actually lined it—completed it—possibly on Sunday. [...][2]

1909 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey

[7 Sep. 1909:]
BRIDGET CAREY, 55, Wells Street, Poplar. I have known prisoner all my life and have generally been on good terms with her. On August 13 we had a quarrel about some money she owed me. On August 14, just after five o'clock, as I was walking with Mary Pawling up Robin Hood Lane prisoner came towards me and said, Biddy, I want to speak to you for a minute. I stepped to one side and she took a cup from under her cape and threw it into my face, saying, "Take that." I felt a burning sensation; I screamed out, 'I'm burnt: it's vitriol. I was taken to Poplar Hospital, where I was kept for a fortnight. I am still an out-patient. I gave prisoner no provocation whatever.

MARY PAWLING, who witnessed the assault, corroborated prosecutrix's statement.

Sergeant WILLIAM BRADLEY, K Division. On my charging prisoner, she said, "Thanks; that's good enough. She hurt me, and I hurt her. She has been persecuting me for a long time." At prisoner's house I found the bottle (produced): it had had vitriol in it; it has the label, "Poison—sulphuric acid." In Robin Hood Lane I found broken pieces of the cup.[3]

1910 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey

[31 May 1910:]
Sergeant GOODCHILD, Y Division. On May 12 I was with Sergeant Page. I arrested Douglas in the "Pindar of Wakefield," Gray's Inn Road. He was with Sharkey. I said to him, "We are going to arrest you for committing a burglary at Curry and Paxton's, Great Portland Street, on the night of May 2." Douglas said, "You will not find anything on me." I took him to Somers Town Police Station, searched him, and found 2s. silver, 4d. bronze, and Exhibits 1 to 6. They were in different pockets. I said, "Where did you get these from?" He said, "They are mine." Later in the day I told him the property had been identified as part of the proceeds of a burglary committed at Curry and Paxton's. Douglas said, "If you can prove it I will plead 'Guilty,' but I am going to say now that a man gave me the property in Rowton House, King's Cross Road, this morning. I do not know his name or where he lives. I shall call Sharkey as a witness, and he is going to say the same thing. No one saw us on these premises; I am going to plead 'Not guilty'; I shall take my chance. Don't go to my mother's." Prisoner was charged and made no reply.[4]

1911 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[5 Sep. 1911:]
Statement of Carlyle: "I had been in bed all day ill. I came out about 10 o'clock. I met the others and had a drink in the Pindar of Wakefield.' I had no idea what they were going to do—I do not believe they had either—until they got to Britannia Street. O'Flaherty and I sat on the doorstep opposite. Sometime after some coats were thrown over and I picked them up. So far I am guilty."

Statement of O'Flaherty: "I plead guilty to being concerned but not breaking and entering. I had been drinking all night."

(Defence.)

ARTHUR CARLYLE (prisoner, on oath). I was lodging in Gray's Inn Road, four doors from the "Pindar of Wakefield." On August 6 at 10.15 p.m. I had two or three drinks with the other prisoners and went with them towards the "Angel." I had no idea of what they were going to do, and I do not believe they had until they came to this hoarding, when Cook and McLaren got over. O'Flaherty and Is at on a doorstep. Two strangers came up and told us to be careful, as we were being watched. I did not go away as I wanted to see what Cook and McLaren had gone for. Inabout [sic] half an hour some things were thrown over. I picked up two dressing gowns and a bag: O'Flaherty picked up the other things.[5]

1911 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[10 Oct. 1911:]
GEORGE STEEL, laborer, Brook Cottage, Robin Hood Farm. About 8.45 p.m. on August 1 I was in a field in Robin Hood Lane when male prisoner came into the field and asked me the way to Wimbledon Common. I went outside and directed him and then I saw the female prisoner. She had something in her arms wrapped up in a white shawl. Prisoners went off together in the direction of the brook.

THOMAS FROST, laborer, 11, Florence Terrace, Kingston. On August 1 about 9 p.m. I was on Beverley Bridge with two friends, when I heard screams coming from the direction of Beverley Brook. I ran to the spot and found a naked baby lying on its back in the centre of the stream screaming. The water was about six inches deep. I called to a Mrs. Blenheim, living close by, and handed the child to her. I afterwards pointed out the spot to a detective. Photographs produced show the place.

Cross-examined by Mr. Rantoul. When I first heard the cries I was about fifty yards away. I think the baby was in danger because in its struggles its head went under the water. The brook is deeper at the sides. This is a favorite walk and on a fine summer night there would be a lot of people passing. Passers-by could not have helped hearing the cries. Where the child was lying the water was not deep enough to cover its body.

Cross-examined by Mr. Shearman. When the baby was found I was there with two friends and Mrs. Brenham's cottage is close by the brook.

Mrs. CAROLINE BLENHEIM, Brook Cottage, Robin Hood Farm. My cottage is about fifty yards from the brook. On August 1 I heard someone calling and ran to the brook and saw a child struggling in the water, screaming. Its head was above water. Last witness handed me the baby and I took it home, wrapped it in blankets, and sent for the police.[6]

Notes