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Records 1801-1900 (texts)

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2016-12-10. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-02-06.

The list includes all 19th century records currently found at IRHB.

Records from the period 1801 to 1900

The following 23 records are found for the period 1801 to 1900:

1810 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[21 Feb. 1810:]
[...] ROBERT LOFTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February, a great coat, value 14 s. the property of James Crooks.

JAMES CROOKS. I am a hackney coachman; on the 12th of February I had a fare to Clapton, on my coming home near one o'clock in the morning, I had the misfortune to overturn my coach, it was dark, I got out of the road into a ditch by the side of a brick field, I got the prisoner to assist me, he could not help me himself, he went and got another man, he came with another watchman and helped me with the horses; I was obliged to leave the coach till day light, I left the great coat on the coach, it was a bye road, I thought it would be safe till morning, the prisoner went with me, and helped put the horses into the stable. I went to the coach again as it was day light in the morning, and the coat was gone, I did not see the coat again untill I saw it at Worship street on the Wednesday.

Q. What is your coat worth.—A. Fourteen shillings.

Q. Was the prisoner a watchman.—A. Yes; he was the first watchman that I called to my assistance.

JAMES GRIFFITH. I am a constable of Hackney; the prisoner was a labouring man and a watchman occasionally, he was on duty that night; I was informed by the other watchman, that the man had lost his coat, he was suspicious that the prisoner had got it, I apprehended him about two o'clock on the Monday, he told me, he had got the coat at home in the closet, I sent the other watchman for the coat.

JOHN SMITH. I am a watchman; I went to the prisoner's house, the wife took the coat out of the closet, and gave it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night mentioned in the indictment, John Crook my prosecutor came along with the coach very much intoxicated; he asked me the way to Balls-pond, I directed him, instead of which he drove towards Robin-Hood Ferry, his coach was plunged into a pit, and from my feeble strength and old age, I could not relieve or ease the horses, therefore I went for another watchman for assistance; we extricated the horses who was lodged for the night at an adjoining house, the coach was obliged to be left till the next morning. The great coat I did not find for two hours afterwards, and I did not imagine that it belonged to the prosecutor, as he never mentioned its loss, the coat was wet and dirty, I found it a great way off the coach, I took it home, and to prevent the wet and dirt from communicating any damp or dirt to me, I wrapped it up in some hay, when I came home I thrust it into a hole under the stairs, in which place it remained till it was fetched away, when I was in custody, I instantly told I had it, I meaned to return it when I found an owner for it, I have lived all my life by my industry, I am very comfortable in my family, I never stole any thing for myself or them: I hope to be acquitted by the court.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.[1]

1812 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[8 Apr. 1812:]
JOHN HUTT. I am an officer, on the 20th of February I went with the last witness to Berner's mews by the Foundling-hospital, we traced the pigs to Woburn-mews, Little Guildford-street, after making two hours enquiry I went to the stable window and forced a pane, we undid the door and got in, the two pigs laid under the manger, I suppose the weight was thirty stone a-piece, they were very much fatigued, I could not get them to stir at all; I fastened the door up again and took my station at the top of the mews to see who came to the stable, presently Stone and Connolly came to the stable, Connolly with a sack under his arm, I let them go towards the stable door, Stone put the key into the door, as soon as I saw the key put in the door I came up and seized them both, Stone asked me what was the matter? I said you keep this stable for other purposes besides horses, you keep pigs in it, he said the two pigs were brought there by a man, he gave him leave to put them in the stable; I observed that they were stolen pigs, and that there were three more wanting, he said that he knew nothing about them; I saw his waistcoat was bloody, I asked Stone where he lived? he said he should have no objection telling me if I would not touch any thing at his house, I told him I knew partly what it was by what I had found in the stable, molasses and sugar, and draining of a distillery, a great quantity was in the stable, a great quantity we took to the Excise office with a still that we found at his house; I got my brother officer to mind the pigs, I found out where Stone lived, it was then about eight o'clock in the evening, I sent my brother officer to Stone's house to enquire if he was at home, I desired him to put his foot in the door to keep the door open until I came up, the door was opened by Mrs. Stone, I knew Stone, his real name is Peppitt, I told her I come about some pigs, we found a still and about five hundred gallons of wash fermentation, we did not find any pigs there, we stopped these all night, a little before six in the morning a person throwed some dirt at the window and smacked a whip at the door, presently a man knocked at the door, I opened the door directly, and Limbrick rushed out and seized Hughes, this was Friday morning, we told him what we apprehended him for, he said he drove the pigs for a German butcher from the ry, he had left him down by Bagnigge-wells, I told him that we had two of the big ones, and that they were stolen pigs; I asked him where he lived, he would not tell; I told him I understood he used the Bell down at Battle-bridge, I should take him down there and make some enquiry, we were going along, and by the Pindar of Wakefield he took me of one side and said he did not want to be exposed, he said he would tell me where he lived, and that the pigs were dead at his house, I went to his house in Smith's-place, Battle bridge, there I found the three pigs hanging up dead there, they would weigh about eleven or twelve stone a piece, they were quite warm all the offal laid upon a table in a large pan, the copper was hot, and hair all lying about, they could not have been killed above four or five hours; I shewed the pigs to Keefe.

Keefe. The pigs Hutt shewed me are my master's property.[2]

1816 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[14 Feb. 1816:]
[...] ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February, four three-shilling Bank tokens, an eighteen-penny Bank token, five shillings, ten penny pieces, and eight halfpence, the property of William Garrand.

WILLIAM GARRAND. I keep the Robin Hood, at Upper Clapton. The prisoner used to be about our house to assist my wife. I had missed a great deal of money out of my till. The prisoner slept three or four nights in my house, and the rest she used to sleep with her parents. In consequence of missing so much money, I marked some with G's and some with W's. We can't keep our till locked always. I left my bar in about an hour and a half, and left my wife at home. I had locked my bar. When I returned, I asked her for the key. When I opened the bar, I missed a three-shilling token and some halfpence. I then fetched an officer, and when he came, I charged the prisoner with having the money, and she said she had none. She did not serve in the bar. She was searched in my presence, and a three-shilling Bank token, a shilling, and a sixpence, all marked were found on her. She also had some half-pence which were marked. The shilling and the six-pence were both marked with a W. The three-shilling token was marked with a G.

GUILTY.

Fined 1s. and delivered to her friends.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.[3]

1822 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (5)

[11 Sep. 1822:]
1431. JOHN MARSHALL and HENRY CORKER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 6 lbs. of veal, value 2s.6d, the goods of William Rennett.

MARY ANN RENNETT. I am the wife of William Rennett, who keeps an eating-house in Joseph-street, Brunswick-square. On Sunday the 28th of July, my area was broken open, and this meat which hung in it stolen. I found it at the office on Monday.

SAMUEL CAYGER. I am a private watchman of Battlebridge. On Sunday the 28th of August, a little after five o'clock, the prisoners passed my box. I saw them turn up Joseph-street, and having suspicious, I called Colton, who took them half an hour after in Gray's Inn-lane, together with a third man. Marshall had something in a parcel under his arm; we stopped them both in a passage, and found the veal in the parcel - he said they found it - the prosecutor claimed it.

WILLIAM COULTON. Cayger's account is correct.

MARSHALL'S Defence. I picked it up in Pindar of Wakefield alley, in a cloth — I saw a man run down there.

CORKER'S Defence. I saw him find it.

MARSHALL — GUILTY. Aged 15.

CORKER — GUILTY. Aged 17.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.[4]

1823 - Little John Birch Coppice in Bagot's Wood

A particular of Woods and Plantations belonging to the Right Honorable William Lord Bagot, in the Parishes Abbot's Bromley and Hanbury, lying together and surrounding Bagot's Park, exclusive of Woods and Lands planted within the ancient boundary of the Park, and also of detached Plantations in the said Parishes. [...] Big John Birch [...] Little John Birch Coppice [...][5]

1824 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (3)

[3 Jun. 1824:]
[...] GEORGE TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March, three garden hand-glasses, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Edward Inkersley.

EDWARD INKERSLEY. I lost three garden hand-glasses about the 13th or 14th of March, from my garden, which is about a quarter of a mile from my house. This man had been employed in a garden at the end of mine, which was divided from it by a fence. I afterwards found them at Clapton, and knew them by a mark upon them — they were in the possession of George Garret. The prisoner was taken in Spa-fields.

GEORGE GARRET. I am a victualler, and live at the Robinhood, public-house, High-hill-ferry, Clapton. I believe the prisoner brought me the glasses — I had seen him once before; I cannot be positive as to his person. There were four glasses brought to me.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT. I took the prisoner into custody on the 24th of April — I did not then know of this charge. As I was taking him to Clerkenwell he said he had a letter written to him, and he took the glasses with the letter.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came to me in Ray-street, Clerkenwell, and asked me to go with him and sell the glasses.

NOT GUILTY.[6]

1825 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[7 Apr. 1825:]
[...] MATTHEW WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, twenty-eight brass cocks, value 50s., thirty brass rods, value 70s.; 5 lbs. of nails, value 2s., and eighteen sheets of sand paper, value 1s., the goods of David Evans.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. DAVID EVANS. I am a stove-grate manufacturer, and live in Crutched-friars. The prisoner was in my service about three years, in the capacity of steel-burnisher—he had access to my premises—I have missed the articles stated in the indictment.

ROBERT ADAMS. I am a carpenter, and live in Charles-street, Westminster. I know the prisoner—he produced some brass cocks, and other articles to sell, on the 7th of February.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not say that it would be better for him to give you some information? A. No, I did not.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you buy any of them? A. Yes, I bought eight cocks of him, at the sign of the Robin Hood public-house—I took them home and Mr. Evans came about a month or five weeks afterwards and I delivered them to him—I gave him 11s. for the cocks and some nails; he paid me 4s. which he owed me—I asked how he got them—he said he worked for different employers, and they sometimes paid him in goods—his father-in-law had worked for me five years—I had no suspicion—I also bought of him some stair carpet rods for 18s. which I delivered to the officer, and the cock likewise.

ELIZABETH ADAMS. I saw the prisoner at my husband's house some time after the 7th of February—he brought a bundle of rods and a bundle of cocks.

JOHN WHEEL. I am an officer of Queen's-square. I received this property from Mr. Adams, which I have kept ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN JORDAN. I am apprentice to Mr. Adams. These marks on the paper are my writing—I tied the cocks up in it—there are twenty-eight, which are worth 2l. 16s.

Prisoner's Defence. There are a great many cocks on the premises, and Mr. Evans can swear to no marks on them—he promised me a free pardon if I would tell him of them.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years.[7]

1825 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[30 Jun. 1825:]
ALEXANDER MITCHEL. I am a Thames-police officer. I went on board the barge Wellington on the 1st of June, with Mr. Gally's foreman and another man; she was shifted to the outside of the barges, ready to go away — I saw Hammerton on board, and asked if he was the master of the barge — he said he was; I had not then told him what I came about. I asked what he had got in the barge — he said empty sacks; I asked if all the malt was delivered — he said it was: I then proceeded to turn over a number of empty sacks, which laid in a bulk in the barge; while I was doing that, he said "There are eight sacks of malt under that tarpauling;" I said "You just now told me all your malt was delivered — how came you to tell me that?" he said he did not know; I asked him who it belonged to — he said he did not know. I then turned the tarpauling on one side, and under seven or eight other tarpaulings, I found eight sacks of malt, most of them marked Richard Gally, Kingston. I think one of them was different, but they were all in the name of Gally. I then took him and the malt, on board the police ship. I asked his name, his employer's name, and the barge's name; he said it was enough for him to be answerable for what he had done himself — that there were only four sacks of this malt that belonged to him, and for them he had paid the man who carried it out of the barge to the cart, to go to the brew-house, and the other four sacks were brought on board by Dick Missen, out of Downe's barge, that morning, and they had shifted them out of Downe's sacks into Gally's; Missen has absconded, and the other two men who assisted to carry the malt out of the barge. I then went to Battle-bridge, and found Gibbons in the Pindar of Wakefield, public-house. I told him he was wanted to go to the brewhouse about some malt being short: I put him in a chaise, and took him to the ship, where Hammerton was, and I heard Green, my brother officer, ask Hammerton, if that was the man he had given the sovereign to for the malt, and he said it was - Gibbons denied it, and Hammerton said "It is useless denying it, the boy has told all about it, and you may as well tell the truth." Gibbons then said he had received a sovereign, but he did not know what Hammerton gave it him for.

CHARLES GREEN. I am an officer. I went with Mitchel to the Pindar of Wakefield — I got Gibbons out; I asked if he had been drawing malt for Coombe and Co. — he said he had; we went down to where Hammerton was, and there I heard the conversation which has been related: Gibbons said he had received the sovereign, but did not know what it was for — he said "It is a bad job but we must make the best of it."[8]

1835 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[11 May 1835:]
JOSEPH WEBB. I live in Pinder's-place, Gray's-inn-road. On the evening of the 14th of May, I was in Gray's-inn-road; I saw the cart, with the horse hanging up; there was a hogshead of sugar and two boxes in it—I went up to give assistance—Allen said there was a man behind, that the hogshead was upon him; and he was sure he was killed—we cut the tarpaulin to get the hogshead out, and Chapman, who was under it, was taken to the doctor's, insensible—I saw the hogshead taken out of the cart, and placed in the road—I was there the whole time the cart was in the road—no sugar came out into the road there was no tin over the hole then—when Mr. Dadds came up, Allen said he had got some sugar in the bag, which he had picked up out of the street, and then he said he picked it up out of the cart.[9]

1838 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[26 Feb. 1838:]
WILLIAM BECK THORPE. I am a butcher, and live at No. 102, Cromer-street. On the night of the 19th of February I was opposite the shop of Richard Cook, at the corner of Pindar-place, about four yards from the door—I saw both the prisoners go into the shop together—Whiting shifted a piece of ham along the window-board till he got it close to the door—he then came out of the shop with it—Wood stood before him, and could see what he was doing—when Whiting came out of the shop I caught hold of him, and he dropped the ham at my feet—I took him inside the shop, and asked Mr. Cook if he had lost any thing—he said a piece of ham—I said, "Here it is, and here is the chap that took it"—Wood was just coming out of the shop—I stopped him—a policeman was sent for, and they were both taken into custody—I had been watching them for some time.

Wood. I went into the shop for an egg—I had not been with him above half an hour—I came down the street with him, but I did not know he had stolen any thing.

RICHARD COOK. I am a cheesemonger, and live in Pindar-place, Gray's, Inn-lane. I remember the prisoners being at my shop about ten o'clock on the night in question—Thorpe seized hold of Whiting just outside the shop, and brought him in—I was very busy at the time, and had not seen Wood—I missed the ham when my attention was called to it, and knew it to be mine when it was produced.[10]

1839 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[8 Apr. 1839:]
[...] HODGES HYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March, 2 sixpences; and 1 knife, value 9d.; the goods of George Courtney, from his person.

GEORGE COURTNEY. I have enlisted in the 94th regiment of foot, and lodge at the Robin Hood public-house, in Duke-street, Westminster. On the 13th of March I fell asleep in the parlour of that house—when I awoke I saw the prisoner lying on a stool, pretending to be asleep—I felt in my pocket, and missed two sixpences and a knife, which had been there when I went to sleep—I told the prisoner, if he gave me what he had of mine I would not trouble him about it—he said he would give me a rap on the head if I asked him for it again—I got a policeman, who searched him, and found sixpence in his trowsers' pocket, and my knife—I had given him 9d. for that knife that very morning.

FRANCES WILLIAMS. I live in Gardener's-lane, Duke-street, and work at the Robin Hood. On the 13th of March I saw the prosecutor in the parlour, and the prisoner down on his knees, picking the prosecutor's pocket—I went up, took him by the neck, and asked what he was doing there—he said he would knock me down—I made an alarm, and the people came up stairs—he ran from the man, laid down on the settle, add pretended to be asleep—we forced him out of the house, and gave him in charge.

JOHN MASSEY TIERNEY. I am a policeman. The prosecutor came to the station-house, and I went with him to the Robin Hood—I afterwards found the prisoner in Charles-street—I searched him at the station-house, and found half a crown and sixpence concealed in the waistband of his trowsers, and in his pocket 6d., some coppers, and two knives, one of which the prosecutor claimed.

Prisoner. When I was first taken, the prosecutor said he had lost a shilling; but when no shilling was found on me, be said it was sixpences—he said nothing about the knife till it was found. Witness. He said nothing about the knife till it was found—the moment he saw it he said, "That is my knife, I bought it of him this morning for 9d."—he at first said he had lost shilling, but directly said, "No, it was two sixpences"—I cannot remember whether that was before I found them—he was sober, but appeared to have been drinking—the prisoner appeared tipsy, but whether that was affectation I cannot say.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with Courtney, and another young man, to the Robin Hood—he bought the knife of me for 9d. and a pot of beer—we tossed for four or five quarterns of rum, and, in stooping for a halfpenny I broke my thumb nail—I asked him to lend me the knife to cut it—he did, and I put it into my pocket—we tossed for more rum—he put his hand into his pocket, and said, "That is the last shilling I have," and paid for it—we laid down to get sober—I fell asleep, and pitched, head foremost, down—the witness came up, hearing me fall, and said, "Oh, you rogue, you want to pick Courtney's pocket"—I said I did not, but I had stumbled over the stool—she brought up two or three men, and charged me with robbing Courtney—I asked him if he had lost any thing—he felt, and said he had not lost any thing—the witness said, "Feel again, for this young man was trying to pick your pocket"—he felt again, and said, "Yes, I had a shilling, which is gone," and said, "Give me the shilling"—I said I had no shilling belonging to him—he said I had, and was going to strip to fight me for it—when I came down stairs, three or four of them pushed me out of the house—the officer said, I had better go, and sit down at the cook's shop, and get sober—I came out of there in a few mintues, and saw Courtney and two policemen at the corner—I went up to speak to them, and he gave me in charge.

JOHN MASSEY TIERNEY re-examined. I took the prisoner in Charles-street—he was apparently coming from the coffee-shop towards me—nothing was said about having lent the prisoner a knife.

GEORGE COURTNEY re-examined. He did not break his finger nail that I know of—I never lent him the knife, I am certain.

FRANCES WILLIAMS re-examined. I was in the tap-room, and heard a noise up stairs—it was not like a man tumbling off a stool—it was like a scuffle—I swear I saw the prisoner's hands in the prosecutor's pocket.

GUILTY. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy.—Confined Three Months.[11]

1843 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[30 Jan. 1843:]
WILLIAM WEAVER. I am a coal and lime-merchant, and live in King's-road, Camden-town. On the 13th of Jan. I saw two carts belonging to Mr. Pratt in Gray's-inn-lane, opposite Fifteen-foot-lane, between ten and eleven o'clock—they were before me, going in the same direction as I was—the two prisoners were with them—I passed them—when I was at Britannia-street, which is some distance from Fifteen-foot-lane, I was about taking a cab—on turning round I saw the two prisoners in conversation together—after a short time I saw Barnard go round the cart, and take two nose-bags—they appeared full—he went down Fifteen-foot-lane, along Paradise-street, and into Britannia-street where I was at that time—I saw Mr. Griffiths coming along Britannia-street—I saw Barnard go into a shop in Britannia-street—I pointed that shop out to Mr. Griffiths—when he went in he had two nose-bags, and when he came out he appeared to have but one, and that was empty—he crossed Britannia-street, and went further along at the back of Chad's-row, and into Pindar-passage—I did not see him come out of Pindar-passage—Kennett was with the carts while Barnard went with the nose-bags—he drove the carts along the Gray's-inn-road till he came to Pindar-passage—the two front horses were brown, and one of the others was grey.

Cross-examined by Mr. PAYNE. Q. Which cart was it that something appeared to be taken out of? A. I think the hind cart, which had the grey horse in it.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I was in Britannia-street on the 13th of Jan. last, about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock—Weaver pointed out a house to me—I saw no person go into that house, but I saw Barnard come out with the nose-bag on his back—it appeared empty, but the mouth of it was stuffed with straw—the house he came out of was 62, or 63, Britannia-street, which is one door beyond Paradise-street—he crossed Britannia-street, and went up George-street—I followed him—he ran away from me up Pindar-passage, which leads into Gray's-inn-road—I followed him, and he joined the team in the road, at the top of Pindar-passage, opposite Cromer-street—Kennett was with the team—I cannot say whether he spoke to Kennett when he joined him—I afterwards went with Archer to the house out of which I had seen Barnard come, and behind some coke sacks we found some corn, chaff, and grains—it was given to Archer, who took it away with him.[12]

1843 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[30 Jan. 1843:]
GEORGE KENT. I am a blind-maker, living in Kensington-row, Gray's Inn-road. I went to the Pinder of Wakefield, in Gray's Inn-road for change—the landlady said she could not give it me—I got change from a man there—I cannot say exactly what it consisted of, but a great deal of it was fourpenny-pieces—the man who gave me change was in company with another—I should know the other man—I believe the prisoner is the man who gave me the change.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you undertake to swear to him? A. I will not.

WILLIAM STOWTON. I keep the Globe, in Darby-street, King's-cross. I remember, on Wednesday, the 28th of Dec., Thorogood coming from a cart with a man—he had some communication with the prisoner there, who had been there before—Barker was with him—they came between two and three o'clock—the prisoner was not sober—the prisoner asked me to change 2l. or 3l. worth of silver—I only took 1l.—there were 12s. or 14s. worth of four-penny-pieces among it—I said, "I have so many joes already, I won't take any more"—I gave one sovereign for 1l. of silver.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take any fourpenny pieces? A. Not one—I saw them.

THOMAS BARKER. On the 28th of Dec. I went with the prisoner to the Pinder of Wakefield—he had 1l. worth of silver—I gave change for a sovereign, because the landlady would not take it—I gave that 1l. worth of silver for the sovereign—the prisoner put the silver there—it consisted of shillings and 10s. or 11s. worth of fourpenny-pieces—we had been to the Globe before—we took them there because they would not take them at the Globe.[13]

1843 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (4)

[8 May 1843:]
WILLIAM REEVE. I keep the Pindar of Wakefield public-house in Gray's-inn-road—the prisoner was in my employ—between nine and ten in the morning of the 22nd of April, I sent him with eleven sovereigns to my son, in Gray's-inn-lane—he was to ask my son to send me 11l. in silver, and to make haste—I saw no more of him till the policeman brought him on the Tuesday—I asked him what he had done with the money—he said he had spent it—this is the bag the money was in.[14]

1844 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[1 Jan. 1844:]
[...] JAMES WICKENDEN. I live at the Robin Hood, High Hill Ferry. On Sunday evening, the 10th of Dec, I saw the prisoners together in my master's tap-room, for about an hour and a half—I did not see any bundle—they had a dog—the prosecutor's field is about two hundred yards from our house.[15]

1844 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (3)

[6 May 1844:]
RICHARD REEVE. I am living at the Pindar of Wakefield. In Nov. I was in the service of a pawnbroker. I produce a piece of crimson velvet pawned by a man on the 20th of Nov.—I gave him this duplicate—I produce three yards of black woollen cloth, pawned on the 11th of Nov. by a man, and a coat pawned on the 18th of Dec. by a man.[16]

1844 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (4)

[25 Nov. 1844:]
JOHN FIELD. I am in the service of Richard Cook, who has two shops, one in Constitution-row, and the other at Pindar-place—I am servant at the Pindar-place shop, which is a fishmonger's—the other shop is a cheesemonger's—Rackham was my master's errandboy, and was employed ployed at both shops—my master's stable is at the back of the Pindar-place shop. On Wednesday, the 30th of Oct., I hung up in the stable a basket which had nothing in it—the next morning I found the basket hanging there still, and it had six herrings, and some bacon and lard in it—on the Friday morning I showed the articles to my master—the basket was hanging still in the stable—I looked over my stock, and missed several herrings—the bacon and lard were not under my care—about a quarter past ten o'clock at night on the 4th of Nov. I saw Smith standing at the corner of the gateway, and he and Rackham went down to the stable to feed the horse—my master was then on the opposite side of the way, and I was at the corner of the shop—in about twenty minutes I saw the prisoners come out of the stable, and Smith had the basket with him—each of them bid one another good night, and Rackham went into the shop, and Smith went away—I called him back and asked him what he had got in the basket—he said he had got nothing—I took it from him, and found these things—I asked him where he got them—he said he bought them in the street—I brought him back to the shop and my master came in—Rackham owned to his guilt, and Smith said he had received things on two different occasions before from Rackham.[17]

1851 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[3 Feb. 1851:]
GEORGE CLAPP. I keep a greengrocer's shop in Pindar-place, Gray's-inn-road. On Tuesday morning 28th Jan. I went out to market about six o'clock or a quarter past—I left my shop-door quite safe—I pulled it to by the knocker, pushed it with my hand, and then with my knee—it had a spring lock inside—I left the gas burning in the shop—a person going by could only see it through the key-hole; there was no glassdoor—I had seen a dressing-case that morning on the drawers in the backparlour before I went out; there were no clothes on the parlour floor then—there were when, I came back.[18]

1862 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[7 Apr. 1862:]
JAMES CHILD (Policeman, 93 E). On the morning of 15th February, about half-past 1 o'clock, I was on duty in Gray's-inn-road, near Mr. Samuels' shop, 8, Pindar's-place, a watchmaker and jeweller—I saw Farrow, and two others not in custody, standing within six or seven yards of the door—on seeing me, Farrow pretended to be drunk, and asked me if I would have something to drink—I told him I did not require anything; and they walked about fifty yards, and returned to the same place—I waited about for some time for farther assistance, and at last I took Farrow and one of the others in custody—(while I was waiting there I discovered that a door had been broken open next to Mr. Samuels'—it is a little shop where they mend china)—they were discharged at the police-court next day for want of evidence—after I got to the station, I went back and found that Mr. Samuels' had been broken open at the back—I got to it from the mews, by passing over several walls with a ladder, which I found placed against a wall—I went to Mr. Samuels' shop, and found it very much deranged—it was then about a quarter to 2.

[...]

JOHN SAMUELS. I am a jeweller and watchmaker, of 5, Pindar's-place—on 14th February I closed my shop at 9 o'clock at night, and went round at 11 and saw it safe—I was called up by the police at a quarter to 2, and found the house had been broken open by the back kitchen door—I missed a quantity of pint, rings, pencil-cases, and watches, to the amount of 30l.—this brooch, pin, and ring (produced) are mine.[19]

1864 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[19 Sep. 1864:]
[...] SARAH AMELIA POWER. I am ten years old, and live with my parents, who keep the Robin Hood public-house, High-hill Ferry—on a Wednesday in August, between half-past 12 and 1 o'clock, the prisoner came in, and asked for half a quartern of gin, which came to 2 1/2d.—he gave me a half-crown—I took it to my mother, who bit it, and put it on the counter—my father took it up, and spoke to the prisoner—the gin was in a bottle, and I took it off the counter.

THOMAS POWER. I am the father of the last witness, and keep the Robin Hood public-house—on 10th August, about half-past 1, I saw my daughter serve the prisoner—he put down a half-crown—she looked at it, and took it to her mother, who bit it, and brought it to me—I took the bottle of gin from the prisoner, and asked him where he got the half-crown—he said that he earned it at shoe-blacking, and got a young chap to give him half a crown for two and sixpence [...][20]

1870 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

[11 Jul. 1870:]
ALFRED FAYER. I am landlord of the Pindar of Wakefield, in Gray's Ion Road—I know the prisoner—I saw him on 25th May, between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, in my bar—he came in and called for some ale, and he then asked to have a 5l. note changed—he handed it to my barmaid, and she brought it in to me—this (produced) is the note—I took it, and went with it to the bar—there was another person with the prisoner—I asked if they wanted change for it—the prisoner said "Yes"—I then asked him to endorse it—pen and ink was handed to him, and he wrote a name and address on the back—it has been partly stamped out at the back—it was "James" something; but what the name was I can't remember, "No. 4, Bird Street"—I saw the prisoner write it—knowing Bird Street I asked him about a man named Russell, who lived there; but he did not know him—I expressed my surprise at his not knowing him—he made some excuse that satisfied me—I gave him the change in gold—there might have been 10s. in silver, and they went away, after drinking what they had called for—no it morning I paid away the note to Mr. Clayton, the gas collector.

[...]

SUSAN COULSON. I am barmaid at the Pindar of Wakefield public-house—on Wednesday, 25th May, between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, the prisoner came to our house with another young man—he asked for some ale, and gave me a 5l. note, which I took into the parlour to Mr. Fayer, and he came out and gave him change, and the prisoner wrote a name and address on the back—I saw him write it—the address was "4, Bird Street"—he received the change and went away.

[...]

JOHN MULVANT. I am an inspector of the detective police—I was instructed to watch at the Midland Station, St. Pancras—on Monday, 30th May, I saw the prisoner come on to the platform, about 10.10, and try the mail-room door—he did not open it, it was locked—I had seen Folkard and the prisoner's brother, Richard, on the platform, some short time before that—Folkard had collected the bags in the usual course, taken them to the mail-room, locked them up, and gone away—after the prisoner tried the door he left the station—Folkard afterwards came to the station again, a few minutes before 11 o'clock, with the bags from the Great Northern Railway—he collected the bags from the up mail train at 11 o'clock, gave them to the mail driver, and then went out of the station, along the Euston Road, to the Victoria public-house, at the corner of York Road, where he joined the prisoner, his brother, and another man—that is about five minutes' walk from the Midland Station—I left them there—on the night of 2nd June I took Richard Bowman into custody—Folkard was taken by Sergeant Moon, on the morning of the 3rd, on another charge—on the morning of the 3rd I went to the prisoner's lodging, Julia Cottage, Marlborough Road, Dalston—he was in bed—his sister brought him down to me—I asked if he knew a person named Folkard—he said he did—I asked when he saw him last—he said "Last Monday," that he was at the railway station with him, and also at the Victoria public-house—that was Monday, the 30th, the day to which I have been referring—I asked him to allow me to look in his room—he did so—I found nothing—on Thursday, 9th June, I again went to his lodging—he was in bed—he was called down, and I said "You know me, I am an officer; I am going to ask you some questions; you need not answer them unless you please; were you in a public-house in the Gray's Inn Road on last night fortnight?—he said "What public-house? '—I said "The Pindar of Wakefield"—he said "I don't know such a house"—I said it was a house not far from the coffee-house in which you and your brother very often slept, in the Gray's Inn Road—he said "I don't know anything about it"—I said "A 5l. note was changed in that house, on that evening"—he said "I know nothing about it"—I said "Were you in any public-house in the Gray's Inn Road on that evening?—he said "No"—I said "Where were you on that evening?"—he said "I can't remember"—I then said "Have you any objection to go with me to the <keyword>Pindar of Wakefield<keyword>?"—he said "No, I have not, I will go with you"—we went in a cab to the corner of Swinton Street; we got out, and when about thirty yards distant, I said, pointing to the house, "That is the house I mean"—he said "Oh, I know that house very well, I have often been there with Folkard"—on going in Mr. Payer and the barmaid were both at the bar—I said to Mr. Fayer "You remember that affair I was speaking to you about the other night? '—he said "Yes"—I said "Do you know this young man?"—he said "Yes, that is the man; do you remember my asking you a question about Bird Street?—the prisoner said "No, I don't"—Mr. Fayer said "Why, you endorsed the note"—he said "No, I know nothing about it"—Mr. Fayer then said to his barmaid "Do you know him?"—she said "Yes, that is the man that gave me the note"—I said to the prisoner "You hear what they say now?"—he said "Yes, I do; but it is a mistake"—I then said to Miss Coulson "You are positive this is the man?"—she said "Yes, I knew him the moment he came into the house"—I then told him he would have to go with me to Bow Street, and I took him into custody—on searching him I found two duplicates, one for a gold Albert, pledged on 17th May, for 15s., and another for a silver watch, on 18th May, for 12s.[21]

1871 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

[10 Jul. 1871:]
JOSEPH WILKS (Policeman G 234). On 27th April, about 10.45, I was called to 9, Wicklow Street, and saw Mrs. Bailey and Dr. Purcell—the prisoner was there; he smelt very strong of drink, and appeared very much excited—I saw the deceased lying on the floor, on her back, with her hands and feet quite straight—while the doctor was examining her neck, the prisoner said to him "I will tell you just how it was, Sir. This was a mutual arrangement between ourselves; last night we were both going to hang ourselves, but Mrs. Bailey came in, so we went to bed and agreed to get up and do it in the morning; about 7.30 I went to the Pindar of Wakefield, to get some rum, because we were going to have something to drink before we did it, and when I came back I found she had forestalled me; and seeing my wife dead, I then tried to make away with myself, but I found I could not do it in the bed room, so I went down in the washhouse and tried to do it there; but Mrs. Bailey came in and prevented me, and I am very sorry for it, because we both meant to die together, because we had been making away with other people's things; and, to avoid an exposure, we made up our minds to hang ourselves"—I took him down stairs, and be tried to force his way up stairs again several times, while the doctor was examining the woman—I asked him what he wanted to go up stairs for, and he said to see what they were doing, because the witness and the doctor might make any tale against him—in the first part of the conversation, he said "If you will follow me, I will tell you how we were going to do it the night before"—I followed him to the washhouse; he got the piece of wood, went up, and placed it crossways on the canopy at the top of the bedstead, and said "I was going to hang at one end, and she at the other" pointing out that he was to hang agin the door, and she agin the fire-place, which was at the side of the bed—I believe the wood was strong enough for them to have done so, but I think the canopy would have toppled over.

Cross-examined by MR. STRAIGHT. Q. The Pindar is about 200 yards from where they lived—he was very much excited, and his breath smelt of rum, or some spirits—I am certain he said that they had arranged to do it the day before, but Mrs. Bailey had interrupted them. [22]

1876 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (3)

[23 Oct. 1876:]
THOMAS BANNISTER (Police Sergeant G). On the night of 2nd October I was passing the Pindar of Wakefield public-house, and saw the prisoner and his wife—a woman, named Draker, came out and spoke to them, and. They all three went into the house—I sent for assistance and placed two constables in a dark place to assist me—the three then walked to the corner of Swinton Street, and I directed the two constables to seize Draker, I followed the prisoner and his wife—I heard a noise, looked round and saw Darker in custody and another constable picking up something—I said "Don't let go of her hand"—he said "She has thrown something away, but I have got it all right"—I went back and took Wilson, who said that he was going home—I said "You have been in company with coiners and I shall arrest you on suspicion"—I told Dickens to seize her other arm—when they were placed in the dock at the station, Draker used an oath, and said "You have done this for us"—I found in the prisoner's trousers pocket this packet, containing two bad half-crowns, with paper between them, and a halfpenny and a bad half-crown loose—Peckham handed me this handkerchief, containing two packets, in one of which were ten bad half-crowns, and in the other five, with blotting paper between each—on Draker was found 5d. and a purse—the prisoner's wife was discharged by the Magistrate.[23]

Notes

  1. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: George Wilson, Royal Offences > coining offences, 23rd October 1876.
  2. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: John Hughes, Richard Stone, Edward Connolly, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th April 1812.
  3. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Elizabeth Taylor, Theft > grand larceny, 14th February 1816.
  4. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: John Marshall, Henry Corker, Theft > grand larceny, 11th September 1822.
  5. [Bagot, William]. Memorials of the Bagot Family (Blithfield, 1824), p. xxix.
  6. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: George Turner, Theft > grand larceny, 3rd June 1824.
  7. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Matthew Wilson, Theft > grand larceny, 7th April 1825.
  8. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Edward Gibbons, Jacob Hammerton, Theft > grand larceny, Theft > receiving, 30th June 1825.
  9. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Frederick Allen, Edwin Chapman, Theft > stealing from master, 11th May 1835.
  10. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Thomas Whiting, David Wood, Theft > simple larceny, 26th February 1838.
  11. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Hodges Hyder, Theft > pocketpicking, 8th April 1839.
  12. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: James Barnard, William Kennett, Theft > stealing from master, 30th January 1843.
  13. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Phillip Hibbitt, Theft > stealing from master, 30th January 1843.
  14. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: George Thomas Allston, Theft > embezzlement, 8th May 1843.
  15. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Michael Murphy, Thomas Barr, Theft > animal theft, 1st January 1844.
  16. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Catherine Green, Ann James, Theft > stealing from master, 6th May 1844.
  17. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Robert Rackham, Edward Smith, Theft > stealing from master, 25th November 1844.
  18. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: John Denley, Theft > housebreaking, 3rd February 1851.
  19. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: William Farrow, William Grant, James Parsons, John Fellows, Susan Gable, Theft > burglary, 7th April 1862.
  20. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Thomas Barnard, Royal Offences > coining offences, 19th September 1864.
  21. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Robert Bowman, Theft > mail theft, 11th July 1870.
  22. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Philip Nunney, Killing > murder, 10th July 1871.
  23. Proceedings of the Old Bailey: George Wilson, Royal Offences > coining offences, 23rd October 1876.