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Persons named Little John (record texts)

{"pagename":"1242 - John le Petit in Ireland","alcent":13,"aldecade":1241,"alyear":1242},{"pagename":"1275 - John Petit of Priestley (1)","alcent":13,"aldecade":1271,"alyear":1275},{"pagename":"1275 - John Petit of Priestley (2)","alcent":13,"aldecade":1271,"alyear":1275},{"pagename":"1275 - John Petit of Priestley (3)","alcent":13,"aldecade":1271,"alyear":1275},{"pagename":"1275 - John Petit of Priestley (4)","alcent":13,"aldecade":1271,"alyear":1275},{"pagename":"1275 - John Petit of Priestley (5)","alcent":13,"aldecade":1271,"alyear":1275},{"pagename":"1275 - John Petit of Priestley (6)","alcent":13,"aldecade":1271,"alyear":1275},{"pagename":"1281 - John le Petit poaching at Howden","alcent":13,"aldecade":1281,"alyear":1281},{"pagename":"1284 - John le Petit presented to church of Hastings","alcent":13,"aldecade":1281,"alyear":1284},{"pagename":"1291 - John son of Germanus le petit","alcent":13,"aldecade":1291,"alyear":1291},{"pagename":"1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (1)","alcent":14,"aldecade":1301,"alyear":1306},{"pagename":"1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (2)","alcent":14,"aldecade":1301,"alyear":1306},{"pagename":"1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (3)","alcent":14,"aldecade":1301,"alyear":1306},{"pagename":"1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (4)","alcent":14,"aldecade":1301,"alyear":1306},{"pagename":"1307 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath","alcent":14,"aldecade":1301,"alyear":1307},{"pagename":"1312 - Safe conduct to John Petit, master of king's ship","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1312},{"pagename":"1313 - Safe conduct to John Petit, master of king's ship","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1313},{"pagename":"1314 - John Petit of Shorne pardoned","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1314},{"pagename":"1315 - John Petit among disobedient mariners","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1315},{"pagename":"1315 - John Petit plunders cargo of ship from Dinant","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1315},{"pagename":"1315 - John Petyt, royal servant","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1315},{"pagename":"1316 - Safe conduct to Little John, master of king's ship","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1316},{"pagename":"1316 - Writ of aid to John le Petit, master of king's ship","alcent":14,"aldecade":1311,"alyear":1316},{"pagename":"1323 - John le Little confiscates ship at Newcastle-on-Tyne","alcent":14,"aldecade":1321,"alyear":1323},{"pagename":"1323 - Littele Johannes of Leicester","alcent":14,"aldecade":1321,"alyear":1323},{"pagename":"1325 - John le Luttle to be arrested","alcent":14,"aldecade":1321,"alyear":1325},{"pagename":"1325 - Mariner John Petit released from the Tower","alcent":14,"aldecade":1321,"alyear":1325},{"pagename":"1332 - John Petit at Canterbury","alcent":14,"aldecade":1331,"alyear":1332},{"pagename":"1348 - John Petit of London","alcent":14,"aldecade":1341,"alyear":1348},{"pagename":"1362 - John Petite of Newton Blossomville","alcent":14,"aldecade":1361,"alyear":1362},{"pagename":"1364 - John Petyt of Shalmsford Street","alcent":14,"aldecade":1361,"alyear":1364},{"pagename":"1365 - John Petit of Abbeville","alcent":14,"aldecade":1361,"alyear":1365},{"pagename":"1365 - John Pety of Seaton Delaval steals flotsam","alcent":14,"aldecade":1361,"alyear":1365},{"pagename":"1366 - John Petit of Dunboyne","alcent":14,"aldecade":1361,"alyear":1366},{"pagename":"1371 - John Little","alcent":14,"aldecade":1371,"alyear":1371},{"pagename":"1373 - Chaplain John Petyt of Fulbourn","alcent":14,"aldecade":1371,"alyear":1373},{"pagename":"1374 - John Litle to be arrested","alcent":14,"aldecade":1371,"alyear":1374},{"pagename":"1446 - John Petyt of London","alcent":15,"aldecade":1441,"alyear":1446},{"pagename":"1447 - John Petyte of Stockbury","alcent":15,"aldecade":1441,"alyear":1447},{"pagename":"1449 - John Petyt of Helions Bumpstead","alcent":15,"aldecade":1441,"alyear":1449},{"pagename":"1451 - John Petit of Cornwall (1)","alcent":15,"aldecade":1451,"alyear":1451},{"pagename":"1451 - John Petit of Cornwall (2)","alcent":15,"aldecade":1451,"alyear":1451},{"pagename":"1451 - John Petit of London","alcent":15,"aldecade":1451,"alyear":1451},{"pagename":"1452 - John Petyt of London","alcent":15,"aldecade":1451,"alyear":1452},{"pagename":"1487 - John Lyttell of Ashburton","alcent":15,"aldecade":1481,"alyear":1487},{"pagename":"1489 - John Littell of Ashburton","alcent":15,"aldecade":1481,"alyear":1489},

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2015-08-28. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-11-08.

The items listed below all concern historical persons – law-abiding or otherwise – named Little John (John Little, John Petit, Parvus Johannes etc.) 'Petit' and 'Parvus' can of course be French/Latin renderings not only of Little but also of Small or Short. This complication is probably less important for the 14th century and earlier than it would be for a later period, for apart from members of the upper classes, during most of the medieval period most Englishmen's surnames had not yet become fixed. They were still often essentially additional (descriptive) identifiers that could be added to the Christian name in contexts were unambiguous reference was desired. A Small might therefore conceivably appear in another context as a Short or Little or, if he earned his daily bread at the anvil, as a Smith. Nonetheless I have left out of consideration individuals surnamed Small or Short. The list will be long enough without them. Criminal Little Johns will we added when found; non-criminal Little Johns are generally only entered if they are recorded before c. 1500 or are of interest for one reason or another.

Records relating to persons named Little John

The following 46 records concern historical Little Johns:

1242 - John le Petit in Ireland

[4 Sep. 1242:]
Mandate to the justiciary of Ireland to enquire whether Ralph, son and heir of Nicholas le Petit, is of age, and if so, to take from him security to pay to the king 200 marks, to wit, 50 marks half-yearly from Easter next, whereby John le Petit, his uncle, made fine on his behalf, to have seisin of the lands and castles of the said Nicholas falling to him by inheritance, [and] to give him seisin of all lands and fees, castles and other things whereof the said Nicholas was seised on the day of his death, saving to the king the reliefs of the said lands.[1]

1275 - John Petit of Priestley (1)

[1275:]
The Township of Fekesby, and John Petit of Presteley have respite until the Steward's coming to Rastrik, to make fine for withdrawing from suit at the mill of Rastrik.[2]

1275 - John Petit of Priestley (2)

[1275:]
Order to distrain the township of Fekesby and John Petit of Presteley to make fine for withdrawing from suit at Rastrik mill.[3]

1275 - John Petit of Priestley (3)

[1275:]
The distress which was ordered upon the township of Fekesby and John Pitit of Prestley, to make fine for withdrawing from suit to Rastrik mill, is respited until the next Court.[4]

1275 - John Petit of Priestley (4)

[1275:]
The distress which was ordered upon the township of Fekesby and John Petit of Prestley, to make fine for withdrawing from suit to Rastrik mill, is respited until the next Court.[5]

1275 - John Petit of Priestley (5)

[1275:]
The distress ordered on the township of Fekesby and John Petit of Presteley, to make fine for withdrawing from suit to Rastrik Mill, is respited until the Earl comes.[6]

1275 - John Petit of Priestley (6)

[1275:]
The distress ordered on the township of Fekesby and John Petit of Prestley, to make fine for withdrawing from suit to Rastrik Mill, is respited until the Earl's coming.[7]

1281 - John le Petit poaching at Howden

[1281:]
Commission of oyer and terminer to W. de Brompton and N. de Stapel-
ton, on complaint by R. bishop of Durham that Master Thomas de Birland,
Nicholas del Haye, Robert de Coyngners, Eluard de Saute Mareys, Robert
de Balliolo, William son of Henry de Jokflet, Adam son of Henry, John le
Clerk, Peter de Lincolnia, Alexander de Cave, William de Haytfeld, William
de Belassise, John de Warewik, Robert de Crigeleston, John le Grrauuger,
Thomas Alger, John le Petit, William Batayl, Robert Bataill, Thomas de
Portinton, William son of William de Garton, John de Kayvill, Richard
de Kayvill, Roger Coy and Walter de Redenesse entered his free warren in
Houeden, co. York, hunted therein and carried away hares.[8]

1284 - John le Petit presented to church of Hastings

[29 Nov. 1284:]
Presentation of Master John le Petit to the church of All Saints, Hastings, in the diocese of Chichester, in the king's gift by reason of the voidance of the abbey of Fécamp.[9]

1291 - John son of Germanus le petit

[30 Aug. 1291:]
Nicholas son of Brian, John son of Germanus le Petit, Robert Sauvage, Henry le Aumbleur and William Fox, which William de Lavinton lately laid before the king but did not prosecute for the death of Giles de Pavely his kinsman whereby the said appeal remains at the king's suit pending there undetermined to their damage. And the sheriff of Nottingham has been commanded to have the said appellees before the said commissioners and to summon jurors, &c.[10]

1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (1)

[1306:]
Luke de Nettreuill, James, Thomas and William de Nettreuill complain that, when they were riding on the King's highway (regia strata) between the bridge of Kennagh and the manor of Nicholas de Nettreuill their father, on the feast of S. Bartholomew last, there came there Stephen de Exon', John le Petyt, Adam de Exon', and Ph. Burnel, with Ric. Hasard, Simon Bray and others unknown, and assaulted and wounded them, to their damage of 200 l.
     And likewise said Nicholas complains that when Adam son of Magowyeus, William son of Ineges, and Roger son of Lewryn, his hibernici, were in the company of said Luke and the others, on same day and place, Stephen and the others assaulted and wounded his hibernici, to his damage of 100l.
     Stephen, John, Adam and Philip defend. They did no trespass. But they acknowledge that whereas Doneghuth Orailly, a faithful man of Theobald de Verdun, had cattle feeding on lands of Theobald, Luke and the others, with horses equipped and a multitude of armed men, took the cattle and drove them almost to the borders of this county. And hue and cry having been raised Stephen and the others with men of peace of those parts, followed them and rescued the cattle from them, as it was lawful for them to do without any injury or trespass.. [sic.]
     Luke and the others say that Duneghuth, by his men, stole from Nicholas many of his cattle, and those of his betaghs. Nicholas sued in this county against him, who did not appear. And when by judgment of the county court, by his default, it proceeded to outlawry [p. 176:] against Doneghuth; he by his friends procured that the Justiciar, for good of the peace, suspended the execution of the outlawry, and made a commission to Ric. de Exon' and Thomas de Snyterby to hear and determine the trespass. Before whom Dunoghuth made fine with Nicholas, by 5 marks, for payment of which at a term assigned, as well Doneghuth as Gilpatrik McMahoun, under whom Doneghuth then resided, granted that they might be forced to give pledges (devadiarentur), by all modes by which they and their men could be, until satisfaction be made, except that the body of Gilpatrik be not taken. And because Doneghuth failed to make payment, Nicholas sent Luke and the others to take a pledge of Doneghuth. Who finding Doneghuth's cattle, took and had them driven away with them, as was lawful for them to do, according to the form of the composition; until Stephen and the others with a great force attacked them, as complained, and rescued the cattle. And they pray that this be enquired. And Stephen likewise. Therefore let the truth be enquired by the country.
     The Jurors say that a thief came to Nicholas' manor of Doueth, and there stole about 60 cows, and drove them to Doneghuth, who then was under the avowry of Gilpatrik McMahoun, a man of Theobald de Verdun. And Nicholas learning this, made suit against Doneghuth to whom the cows came, up to outlawry. And because it was related to the Justiciar that Doneghuth was wont to repress (gravare) the felons of his parts, for the good of the peace, the Justiciar assigned Ric. de Exon' etc. (as in the stament of Luke). And afterwards Nicholas to whom 20s. of the fine were in arrear, hearing that Doneghuth was in the land of Stephen, sent Luke and the others with horses equipped, to take a pledge for the debt. Who coming to Stephen's land found a shepherd keeping cows in his pasture, of whom they asked whose the cows were; who answered that they were Doneghuth's. And they took the cows and drove them to the manor of Nicholas, of Doueth. And when they were driven a little way from the shepherd, who for fear of them dared not before cry out, he raised hue and cry. On which Stephen, who was near, mounted his horse, without arms, and followed them. And when he came to them, he asked that they should deliver him the cattle, and he would undertake that there should be done to Nicholas as justice might require, for said cattle. And Luke answered that he could not do this without Nicholas his lord; and he asked him to come with him to his lord. And when Stephen saw that he gained nothing, but that he was answered by rough words, he returned, and came to the house of John Petyt, who would have gone out to the hue unarmed, but Stephen forbad him, because Luke and the others were well armed and on equipped horses. And so Stephen took part of John's arms, and so they armed themselves, and with the others named and their men, and others who came to the hue, followed Luke and the others, and approached them about the distance of a league from the manor of Nicholas. And they sent their footmen to go before the cows to lead them back. So that immediately there was a conflict between the footmen of Luke, who drove the cows, and them. Luke looking back rode towards them and struck one of the footmen who came with Stephen, with a spear, under the arm; so that the spear passed through the middle of the footman's tunic without wounding him. But one of his company, being his kinsman, thinking that he was struck through the body, went to Luke and struck him in the head on [p. 177:] his iron headpiece, so that the headpiece was thrown to the ground. And John le Petyt seeing this doubting lest greater evil should happen approached Luke, who so had his head uncovered, and laid hands on him to hold him. On which Luke drew a dagger (anelacium) to free himself, from John's hands. At which some of John's men came, and seeing Luke, with his dagger drawn, and John, struggling together, struck Luke with a spear in the arm and gave him a severe wound, which grieved John, who let him go as soon as he saw that he was wounded. And so the parties withdrew from one another, Stephen and John bringing home the cows with them, except four cows which remained in ditches near, of which two were so wearied by the driving and so weak from it, that they could scarcely be driven to the manor of Nicholas. And when Nicholas saw that they could not live, he had them killed and salted. He however liad them first valued, understanding that if they perished it would be to his damage, because they fell to him for part payment of the debt against Doneghugh. And the other two cows yet remain with Nicholas. And they say that in the conflict, James, Thomas, and William were struck, but none of them wounded except Luke. But certain of the footmen on each side were wounded.
     Afterwards in the quinzaine of S. Hilary, at Dublin, the parties come. And a day is given them at the three weeks of Easter.
     Afterwards at the month of Easter a. r. i. Edw. II, the King the father being dead, and the plea being resummoned at the suit of Luke &c., to wit, in the same state as it was at said three weeks of Easter and which afterwards by death of the King remained sine die; it is adjudged that Luke and the others recover against Stephen &c. their damages, taxed by the jury at 10 marks. And let Stephen and the others be taken. And Stephen was attached by Will. Beaufiz and John Beaufiz. And Philip, by Adam Belejaumbe, and Ric. Bernard, who now have them not; therefore they in mercy. And this judgment is made against Stephen and the others, by their default after the Sheriff was commanded to make them come.
     Afterwards Stephen, John, Philip, and Adam made fine by 40s. before W. de Burgo, locum tenens of the Justiciar, as appears in the rolls of common pleas of the term of S. Michael a. r. ii. Ed. II.
     Damages 10 marks, whereof W. de Bourn 4 marks, J. de Patrik-churche 40s. and Nicholas the clerk senior 40s.[11]

1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (2)

[1306:]
     Nich. de Netteruill puts Luke de Netteruill or Will, de Netteruill, v. Theobald de Verdon senior, John Petit, Stephen de Excestre, Simon Bray, Ph. Burnel, and John son of Ric. de Excestre, of a plea of trespass.[12]

1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (3)

[1306:]
     ch. de Nettreuill puts Ric. Mannyng and Warin Myles, against Theobald de Verdun sen., John [Petyt], Stephen Dexcestre, Ric. son of Ric. Dexcestre, Simon Bray, and Ph. Burnel, of a plea of trespass.
     Luke de Nettreuill puts same against same. [... p. 292: ...]
     James de Nettreuill puts Ric. Mannyng and Warin Myles, against Theobald de Verdun sen., [John] Petyt, Stephen de Exon', Ric. son of Ric. de Exon', Simon Bray, and Ph. Burnel, of a plea of trespass.
     Thomas de Nettreuill puts as above.
     Ric. Proutfot puts same against Theobald de Verdun, of same.[13]

1306 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath (4)

[1306:]
     Day is given to Luke de Nettreuill, James de Nettreuill, Tliomas de Nettreuill, and Will, de Nettreuill, plaintiffs, and Stephen de Exon', John le Petyt, Ric. de Exon', and Ph. de Burnel, of a plea of trespas.[14]

1307 - John le Petit accused of assault in Meath

[1307:]
     Day given to Luke de Nettreuill, James de Nettreuill, Thomas de Nettreuill and William de Nettreuill, v. Stephen de Exon', John le Petyt, Ric. de Exon', and Ph. Burnel, of a plea of trespass. To the quinzaine of S. Michael, at prayer of the parties, without essoin.[15]

1312 - Safe conduct to John Petit, master of king's ship

[6 Sep. 1312:]
  Safe conduct, until Christmas, for John Petit, master of the king's ship la James of Westminster, going to divers parts on the king's business.
By K.
  The like for the under-mentioned mariners: Robert Gold, master of the king's ship la l'etre of Westminster; Richard atte Wose, master of the king's ship la Weliwonne.[16]

1313 - Safe conduct to John Petit, master of king's ship

[26 Jul. 1313:]
  Safe-conduct, until Christmas, for Andrew Rosekyn, king's mariner, master of the king's ship called la Godeiere of Westminster, whom the king is sending to Calais on his business.

  The like for the undermentioned mariners, viz.:—
   William le Fisshere, master of the king's ship called la Welifare of Westminster.
   John Petit, master of the king's ship called the James of Westminster.[17]

1314 - John Petit of Shorne pardoned

[1 Sep. 1314:]
  Pardon to John Petyt of Shorne, co. Kent, on account of his good service in Scotland, for the death of John le Ismongere of Shorne, and also of any outlawry incurred thereby.
By K. on the information of W. de Melton.

  The like, word for word, for John Poteman of Shorne, co. Kent.

By K. on the information of W. de Melton.[18]

1315 - John Petit among disobedient mariners

[8 Oct. 1315:]
  Writ de intendendo, under pain of forfeiture, directed to John Mot and his fellow mariners, for Humphrey de Littlebury and John Sturmy, captains and admirals of the king's fleet. The writ was issued in consequence of John Mot and his fellow mariners contemning the commands of the said Humphrey de Littlebury and John Sturmy as captains of the fleet, at which the king was much incensed.
By K. & C.
  The like directed to the under-mentioned mariners, viz.:—
William le Fissher, Luke de London, John Petit, Richard Golde, Richard de la Woses, and their fellow mariners.[19]

1315 - John Petit plunders cargo of ship from Dinant

[22 Jul. 1315:]
The like [i.e. a commission of oyer and terminer] to John de Fresingfeld, Richard de Walsingham and Richer de Reefham, on complaint by Ralph Frapaile, John Hungeri (Hungrie), Gervase Waretes' and John Compaile, merchants of Dynaunt in Almain, that, when a ship which they had laden at le Swyn in Flanders with divers wares to take to England was driven ashore near Bromholm, co. Norfolk, and they had taken the goods ashore, John Petit of Westminster, Thomas Springot and Alice his wife, John Springot, John Faireman and Joan his wife, Robert Lenys, John Seitesele, Bartholomew Merke, John Mot, William le Fisshere, John le Fisshere, Richard Eliot, Richard atte Wase, Robert Peverel, Ralph Bruneman, Martin son of Amice, William Ethe and Margery his wife, William Proudefot and Amice his wife, Stephen de Marisco, John Grygge of Houpp, John Belle, Thomas de Hull, Walter 'on Thenesse,' William le Mazoun, Richard Bat, Sweteman Flemyng, Adam Cadeford, John Stane, Richard Oseborn, William Werke and Joan his wife, Letitia Springot and others of the counties of Norfolk and Kent carried away a great part of the said goods.
By K.[20]

1315 - John Petyt, royal servant

[23 Apr. 1315:]
Commission of oyer and terminer to Henry Beaufiz and Richard de Wyndesore, on complaint by William Lestalouner, Richard de Wenise, Richard de Cherteseye, Nicholas de Hamslape, John Russel, William de Fremesworth, Reginald de Florencia, Roger de Stafford, Adam de Louermouth, John Petyt, John de Aleville, Richard Lestalouner, John Barou[21], John de Kancia, Roger de Escarburgh, Robert de Roff', John de Nedham, Roger de Langele, Robert de Derby, John de Wynton, Richard Pycard, Thomas de la Marche, Nicholas de Parys and Miles de Wylmedele, men and servants of the king's Household, that William Wydeby of Abingdon, Thomas Sampson, 'taverner,' William le Bowyer of Abingdon and John his brother, William de Bloxham, Adam le Barbour, John le Chapeleyn, John Niepayn, John le Fissher, Richard Cary, John de Bisshopeston, Geoffrey de Stokes, Philip de Mixtbury, Thomas Fykeys, Andrew de Pury, Gilbert de Grenestede, Richard le Spicer, Richard Bisshop, John Goneys, John le Peytour, John le Bolter, William de Codesford, Simon de Marcham, Richard Maynard, John Coldcote, John de Henle, Richard Pourt, John Makkeneye, John de Stanton, 'boucher,' the elder, John Bruneye, Robert Lorfevre, and William de Spaldingge, together with others, assaulted them at Oxford, and imprisoned them.
By K.[22]

1316 - Safe conduct to Little John, master of king's ship

[24 Sep. 1316:]
  Safe-conduct, until Easter, for Richard Golde, master of a ship called 'la Petre' of Westminster, whom the king is sending to Aquitaine for wines to be brought to him to England.
By K.
  The like for the under-mentioned masters, viz.:—
   Thomas Sprynget, master of a ship called 'la Margarete' of Westminster.
   Little John (Parvus Johannes), master of a ship called 'la Michel' of Westminster.
   Roger Catour, master of a ship called 'la Blithe' of Westminster.[23]

1316 - Writ of aid to John le Petit, master of king's ship

[21 Jul. 1316:]
  Writ of aid until the Nativity of St. Mary in impressing mariners to man his ship for Roger Catur, master of a ship of the king called 'la Blie' of Westminster, whom the king is sending with other ships of his to take victuals to the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed for the strengthening thereof.
By K. [p. 520:]
  The like for the under-mentioned masters, viz.:—
   John le Petit, master of the ship called la Michel of Westminster.
   Richard Golde, master of the ship called the ship of St. Peter of Westminster.
   The master of the ship called la Margarete of Westminster.[24]

1323 - John le Little confiscates ship at Newcastle-on-Tyne

[1323. July 27:]
To the mayor and bailiffs of Newcastle-on-Tyne. Whereas at the complaint of John Vanele and Claisus Hourel of Brugge, merchants of Flanders, that, after the truce lately made between the king's subjects and the men of the count of Flanders until Michaelmas next and proclaimed at Easter last, they and certain of their fellows loaded a ship in Flanders with wine, cloth, wax, and other wares, to the value of 900l., in order to bring the same to Newcastle-on-Tyne, John le Little, Roger Catour, Cokkus atte Wose, and certain others with them entered the ship by force on her voyage thither in the water of Tyne between Tynemuth and Newcastle, on Wednesday before St. George last, and assaulted the men and mariners of the ship, and arrested certain of them with the ship and goods, and delivered them and the ship and a great part of the goods to the aforesaid mayor and bailiffs to be detained under arrest, taking away with them nevertheless a great part of the goods, the king ordered the mayor and bailiffs, if they found the premises to be true, to release the said men and the ship and goods, and the king caused the ship and goods in the possession of the mayor and bailiffs to be delivered to the aforesaid merchants; and the king now understands that the aforesaid Roger and Cokkus have returned to Newcastle; he therefore orders the mayor and bailiffs to arrest the said Roger and Cokkus, and to cause them to be kept under safe custody until the aforesaid merchants have been satisfied for all their goods that came into the possession of Roger and Cokkus.

By K. on the information of Master R. de Baldok.[25]

1323 - Littele Johannes of Leicester

[?1326-29:]
Henry Cooper taken on suspicion of larceny and imprisoned in the prison of the town of Leicester, confessed that he stole a horse in Beaumondheye. He appealed Ric. le Thressher of aid in the felony and Ralph le Staleworthman dwelling in the street of the Abbey of Leicester that he helped him in a burglary and took 3s.. for his share of the clothes and brass stolen; he appealed also Geoff, le Pultere1 and Little John (Littele Johannes) his groom, Rob. Sabyn le Siveker and others for their share in other burglaries.

Et predictus appellator liberatus fuit ad Gaolam domini Regis Leycestrie.

[Editor's translation:]
And the said appellant was delivered to the King's gaol of Leicester.[26]

1325 - John le Luttle to be arrested

[27 May 1325:]
Appointment of Simon de Redyng, serjeant at arms, to arrest Richard atte Wose, John le Luttle and Roger le Catour and bring them to Neugate gaol to be delivered to the sheriffs there by indenture.
By K.[27]

1325 - Mariner John Petit released from the Tower

[1325. Dec. 31:]
To the treasurer and barons of the exchequer. Order to cause John Petit, mariner, Catour, mariner, and Cok' atte Wose, mariner, who are imprisoned in the Tower of London, to be released, upon their finding mainpernors that they will not eloign themselves and that they will be always ready at the king's pleasure when summoned in this behalf, so that by this mainprise they may go at large and sue to recover their debts for their discharge. The king has ordered the constable to bring them before the treasurer and barons, and to release them from prison at the order of the treasurer and barons.
By p.s. [7277.]

Mandate in pursuance to the constable. By p.s.[28]

1332 - John Petit at Canterbury

[1332:]
Pardon to the abbot of St. Augustine's, Canterbury, Nicholas Dagh, one
of the monks, John Petit the younger, and Thomas Everard, for having
rescued Master Peter de Dene, said to be a monk of the abbey, from the
custody of William de Reculvre, steward of the liberty of the archbishop
of Canterbury, who, by the king's command, had arrested him, with
William Chaunterel and John his brother, at Bisshopesbourne on an appeal
lately laid against them before the steward by Thomas de Fyndon that they
had robbed him at the abbey of 111 Florentines, worth 33 marks 3s. 4d.,
and of 6 dishes, 6 saucers, a cup, a water-pot and 6 spoons, all of silver,
and 25s. in money, and for having then brought him with the said
Florentines to Canterbury and there kept him in the abbey.     By p.s.
  Pardon, at the request of the abbot, to the said Master Peter de Dene for
the robbery, as Thomas de Fyndon has not prosecuted his said appeal
after the king had caused it to be brought before him.        By p.s.[29]

1348 - John Petit of London

[1348/49:]
William de Evesham, and John Petit, and Joan, his wife. A messuage in the parish of St. Clement Danes, without the Bar of the New Temple, London.[30]

1362 - John Petite of Newton Blossomville

[20 Mar. 1362:]
Pardon, for good service done in the war of France in the company of the king’s clerk Richard de Thorne, then clerk of the king’s avenary, to John atte Brugge of Clifton of the king’s suit for the death of John Petite of Newenton Blosmeville, killed before Michaelmas in the thirty third year, whereof he is indicted or appealed, and of any consequent outlawry. By p.s.[31]

1364 - John Petyt of Shalmsford Street

[16 Apr. 1364:]
Exemplification, at the request of Nicholas de Lovayn and Margaret, his wife, now tenants of the manor of Osprenge, of the tenours of inquisitions as follows:—
  1. Taken by John de Vieleston, late escheator in the county of Kent, at Osprenge, on Sunday the morrow of the Circumcision, 18 Edward III, touching knights’ fees held of the manor. [Chancery Inquisitions, Misc. File 151, No. 20.]
  2. The like, taken on Friday the feast of St. Lucius the Pope, 19 Edward III, finding that there pertain to the manor and are held of it 15½ knights’ fees, as of the honour of Peverell as appears below :—of the five knights’ fees which Hamo de Gatton lately held Thomas son and heir of William de Deon holds a fee and a half in Thrulegh and Borstall, worth 15l. yearly, ½ fee in Bocton Malerbe, worth 1008. yearly, ½ fee in Wornesell, co. Kent, worth 100s. yearly, and John Beneyt and John Petyt hold of the same Thomas at Shanelesford, co. Kent, half a knight’s fee, worth 40s. yearly, and owe to the said Thomas for the ward of Dover Castle, every twenty weeks, 5s. And Thomas owes for these three entire fees suit to the court of Osprenge every three weeks, homage to the lord of the manor, scutage, relief, ward and marriage, and 30s. every twenty weeks to the ward of Dover castle, to wit 10s. for each fee; of those five fees aforesaid, Robert, son and heir of Simon de Northwode, knight (militis), holds two fees in Gatton, co. Surrey, and owes suit to the court of Osprenge, homage and services as above and they are worth 20l. yearly, and he owes to the ward of Dover Castle for every twenty weeks 20s. Of the quarter of a knight’s fee of Godesenemy of Eslynges, William earl of Huntingdon, holds in right of Juliana, his wife, one moiety in Osprenge, and it is worth 25s. yearly, Walter Cook, chaplain, holds a moiety of a moiety of that quarter in Osprenge and it is worth 12s. 7d. yearly; and the master of God’s House, Osprenge, holds the other part of that moiety of the quarter and it is worth 13s. 4d. yearly, and these three owe for that entire quarter one suit to the court of Osprenge and each by himself owes homage and services as above, and they owe jointly to the ward of Dover Castle for the quarter every twenty weeks 2s. 6d.
     Of the three fees which John Mars held, Roger de Northwode, knight, holds one fee in Wychelyng, co. Kent, of the said manor by suit, homage and services as above, and he owes to the ward of Dover 10s. every twenty weeks, and it is worth 10 marks [p. 487:] yearly; also Reynold de Cobham, knight, holds of the same the manor of Shelve, co. Kent, for one quarter and a moiety of a quarter of a fee, of the manor of Osprenge by suit, homage and services as above, and he owes to the ward of Dover Castle 3s. 9d. every twenty weeks, and it is worth 8 marks yearly; of the same also, Henry de Mars holds ¼ fee in Cobham of Reynold heir of Reynold de Rokesle by homage and he owes to Reynold to the ward of Dover Castle 2s. 6d. every twenty weeks, and it is worth 50s. yearly: of the same also, Margaret late the wife of Stephen de Asshewy, knight, holds a knight’s fee at Okemere, co. Kent, of the said Reynold by homage and she owes to Reynold to the ward of Dover Castle 10s. every twenty weeks, and it is worth 5 marks yearly; of these also, the said Reynold holds the manor of Sentlyngges, co. Kent, for one quarter and a moiety of a quarter of a fee, and it is worth 10l. yearly, and he owes for himself and his tenants to the ward of Dover Castle 16s. 3d. every twenty weeks, and doing suit to the court of Osprenge every three weeks, homage to the lord of the manor and services as above.
     Of the 3 fees which Henry Cramavill held, Robert, earl of Suffolk, holds the manor of Gravesende for one fee, of the manor of Osprenge by suit, homage and services as above, and he owes to the ward of Dover Castle 10s. every twenty weeks, and it is worth 20 marks yearly:
     Of the same also, Solomon de Hollane holds ½ fee in Westclyve, co. Kent, by suit to the court of Osprenge, homage to the lord of the said manor, and services as above, and he owes therefor to the ward of Dover Castle 5s. every twenty weeks, and it is worth 5 marks yearly:
     Of the same, Walter de Chestehunte, knight, held 1 fee in Reynham, co. Essex, of the manor of Hospreng, by suit [and] homage, but who now holds it or the value the jurors know not.
     Of the same also, John Orby held ½ fee in Dengeye, co. Essex, of the manor of Osprenge by suit and homage, but they know not who now holds or the value.
     Of the three fees which Hugh de Gerounde lately held, Henry de Calfhunt, knight, holds ½ fee in Wrenstede and it is worth 100s. yearly, also ½ fee in Esseherst, co. Kent, and it is worth 10l. yearly, also 1 fee in Dodyngton, co. Buckingham, and it is worth 20l. yearly.
     Also Thomas del Haye holds 1 knight’s fee in Foxcote, co. Buckingham, of the said Henry and it is worth 10 marks yearly, and he owes to Henry homage and to the ward of Dover Castle 10s. every twenty weeks, and Henry holds the said three fees of the manor of Osprenge by suit, homage and services as above, and he owes to the ward of Dover Castle 20s. every twenty weeks.
     Also John de Viene holds ¼ fee in Potewode in Osprenge and Thopnherst in Hedecrone, co. Kent, of the manor of Osprenge by suit, homage and services as above, and nothing is due to the ward of Dover Castle and it is worth 20s. yearly:
     Also Roger de Northwode, knight, holds 2 [parts] of 1 knight’s fee in Herietesham, co. Kent, and they are worth 10 marks [p. 488:] yearly; and William, earl of Huntingdon holds in the same town a third part of l fee in right of Juliana his wife, and it is worth 5 marks yearly; and for the said fee the earl and Roger owe suit to the court of Osprenge, homage, feudality, relief, ward and marriage, but nothing to the ward of Dover Castle.[32]

1365 - John Petit of Abbeville

[7 Aug. 1365:]
The like [sc. commission of oyer and terminer] to Richard, earl of Arundel, Ralph Spigumell, Andrew Peverel and William Merlot, touching a complaint by John Petit, merchant of Abbevill, that some evildoers boarded a ship of his laden with wheat and other goods, wounded the mariners, brought the ship and cargo to the county of Sussex and sold the same there.By K.[33]

1365 - John Pety of Seaton Delaval steals flotsam

[8 Feb. 1365:]
Commission of oyer and terminer to John de Strevelyn, John Moubray, Thomas de Ingelby, John de Fencotes, Roger de Fulthorp, Gocelin Sourteis and William de Kellowe, on complaint by William son of Michael de Flyssyng that, whereas a ship called Palmedagh of Flyssyng, laden at Le Scone with divers goods and merchandise of his, when sailing towards Newcastle-upon-Tyne, was driven by a storm on the coast by Seton Delavale, co. Northumberland, and the goods and merchandise were cast ashore, and he escaped to land alive, Alan Clerk, John Caritate, Robert Lange, Roger Watson, John Daweson, Roger Clerkson, Roger Hoghird, Robert Hoghird, John Husband, John Carter, John Wyly, Robert Forester, William de Bedelyngton, John Walssh, William Hyne, John Caleys, Richard 'Richard Watkynesmanservant,' Robert Baret, Robert Kyn, John 'Watkynman,' Thomas Wyld, William Gray, Richard Fox, Richard Brade, John Pety, Roger Salter and others, carried away the goods and merchandise. For 20s. paid in the hanaper.[34]

1366 - John Petit of Dunboyne

[26 Oct. 1366:]
Whereas Henry de Ferrariis and Joan, his wife, have shewn the king that whereas certain discords and debates lately arose between the said Henry and Walter Cusak, 'chivaler,' over the inheritance of the said Joan, and Henry and Walter were arrested by the king’s justices in Ireland and inhibited on the king’s behalf from doing anything against each other except by the law of Ireland, the said Walter and James le Hide, 'chivaler,' Simon son of John Cusak, 'chivaler,' Hugh son of William Petit, Cristallus Petit of Pireston, John Petit of Dunboyn, John Launsayn of Dyvelyn, John Rudipak and others of their confederacy, assuming to themselves the royal power, ejected the said Henry and Joan from Joan's inheritance of the annual value of 600 marks, by armed force, without any process of law, took away goods to the value of 500 marks from the manors and places of the said inheritance, assaulted and wounded the said Henry, and besieged him within his manor of Cluneye until he was rescued by Lionel, duke of Clarence, the king’s lieutenant, and so threaten the said Henry and Joan in life and limb that they dare not stay in those parts to prosecute their rights against the said Walter, to the contempt and prejudice of the king and their grave damage, and to the hurting of the king’s peace and the manifest terror of the king’s people in that part, the king has taken the said Henry and Joan, and their men, servants, lands, rents and possessions into his special protection for one year; directed to the said Lionel, and all other lieges in Ireland. By K.[35]

1371 - John Little

[29 July 1371:]
Commission to Robert Ramesay, John Roux, Henry Hale, Robert Brabisson, Richard Style and John Cotland, pursuant to the statute against taking salmon in forbidden seasons (Stat. Westm. the Second, cap. 47), to keep the statute in the water of Thames; as the king has learned that many fishermen and others take salmon in [p. 175:] divers places in the said water with nets called 'trymkes' and other devices.
 Afterwards, on 18 August, John Stodeye, John Little and John Torald were associated in the said commission.[36]

1373 - Chaplain John Petyt of Fulbourn

[16 Oct. 1373:]
[Pardon of outlawry to] John Boys of Great Dunmowe, for non-appearance to answer John Petyt of Fulburn, chaplain, touching a plea of debt of 20 marks. [37]

1374 - John Litle to be arrested

[15 July 1374:]
Commission to David Berdevyll, Henry Traynel, John Salesbury and John Bisouthe, serjeants-at-arms, for certain causes propounded before the king and council, to arrest John Kyttesone, John Longe, William Berkyngge, John Ermyn, John Lucas of Queneshithe, Thomas Skinner by ‘La Riolle,’ John Bylneye, William Bylneye, John Yonge, John Litle, Ralph Smith of Reynham, John Fullere of Dagunham, John Elyne, William Martlesham, John Grene, 'Picard,', John Whytbred, John Dodele, William Cook, John Tredegold, Richard Gerald, Roger Kendale, Henry Juwet, Robert Cavendish, John Sharp and Nicholas Wyndrawere, bring them to London and deliver them to the sheriffs to be kept safely in Neugate gaol until further order for their deliverance. By C.[38]

1446 - John Petyt of London

[Nov. 10 1446:]
William Dymmok of Teukesbury, co. Gloucester, 'hosyer,' for not appearing before the justices of the Bench to answer John Petyt, citizen and grocer of London, touching a debt of 40s.London.[39]

1447 - John Petyte of Stockbury

[May 8 1447:]
William Taunton of Stokebury, co. Kent, 'husbondman,' for not appearing before the same [sc. the justices[40]] to satisfy Robert Sybelynge of 40s., recovered by Robert by reason of a plea of detention of a writing obligatory, which Robert recovered against John Petyte of Stokebury, 'gentilman'; and to answer the same Robert touching a debt of 20 marks. Kent.[41]

1449 - John Petyt of Helions Bumpstead

[24 Oct. 1447:]
John Petyt late of Bumsted Helyon, co. Essex, 'husbondman,' for not appearing before the same ['Richard Neuton and his fellows',[42] i.e. the judges] to answer Gerard le Hay and John Brun touching a debt of 10l. Essex.[43]

1451 - John Petit of Cornwall (1)

[Aug. 16 1451:]
Commission to William Bonevile of Chuton, knight, John Colsyll, knight, Nicholas Ayssheton, John Petit, Thomas Bere and the sheriff of Cornwall, appointing them to make inquisition in the county touching all goods and merchandise, not customed or cocketed, shipped in the county, and touching all arrests made and not observed, and all armour and victuals sold to the king's enemies and the value thereof, and by whom done.[44]

1451 - John Petit of Cornwall (2)

[Aug. 15 1451:]
Commission to John Colsill, knight, John Nanfan, esquire, and John Petit, appointing them to array all men at arms and other fencible men, as well hobelers as archers, in Cornwall and to lead them to the seacoast and other places in the county to resist the king's enemies, and to take the muster of the same from time to time, and cause wards and vvatches to be kept and 'bekyns' to be set up in the usual places, committing to prison all contrary herein, till further order.[45]

1451 - John Petit of London

[May 15 1452:]
John Immayn of Coventre, co. Warwick, 'bocher,' for not appearing before Richard Neuton and his fellows to answer John Estmond the younger of Rode, co. Somerset, touching a debt of 40s.; and by the name of John Emeyn late of Coventre, to answer John Petit, citizen and grocer of London, touching a debt of 40s. London.[46]

1452 - John Petyt of London

[May 15 1452:]
John Vertu, late of Colchestre, co. Essex, 'dyer,' for not appearing before the justices of the Bench to answer John Petyt, citizen and grocer of London, touching a debt of 8l. 14s. Middlesex.[47]

1487 - John Lyttell of Ashburton

[1487:]
John Lyttell for work—4d.[48]

1489 - John Littell of Ashburton

[1489:]
22d. at the hands of John Littell & John Wreyfforde collected on Souls' Eve.[49]

Discussion

Also see

Notes

  1. [Black, J G, compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. Henry III. A.D. 1232–1247. (London; Edinburgh: Dublin, 1906), p. 320.
  2. Baildon, William Paley, ed. Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, vol. I. 1274 to 1297 (The Yorkshire Archæological Society. Record Series, vol. XXIX) (1901), p. 107.
  3. Baildon, William Paley, ed. Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, vol. I. 1274 to 1297 (The Yorkshire Archæological Society. Record Series, vol. XXIX) (1901), p. 122.
  4. Baildon, William Paley, ed. Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, vol. I. 1274 to 1297 (The Yorkshire Archæological Society. Record Series, vol. XXIX) (1901), p. 133.
  5. Baildon, William Paley, ed. Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, vol. I. 1274 to 1297 (The Yorkshire Archæological Society. Record Series, vol. XXIX) (1901), p. 137.
  6. Baildon, William Paley, ed. Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, vol. I. 1274 to 1297 (The Yorkshire Archæological Society. Record Series, vol. XXIX) (1901), p. 144.
  7. Baildon, William Paley, ed. Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, vol. I. 1274 to 1297 (The Yorkshire Archæological Society. Record Series, vol. XXIX) (1901), p. 153.
  8. [Black, J.G., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward I. A.D. 1272-1281 (London, 1901), p. 470.
  9. [Black, J.G., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Morris, G.J., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward I. A.D. 1281-1292 (London; Edinburgh and Glasgow; Dublin, 1893), p. 146.
  10. [Black, J.G., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Morris, G.J., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward I. A.D. 1281-1292 (London; Edinburgh and Glasgow; Dublin, 1893), p. 458.
  11. Mills, James, ed. Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls on Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland Preserved in the Public Record Office of Ireland. Edward I. Part 2. XXIII to XXV Years (London, 1914), pp. 175-77.
  12. Mills, James, ed. Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls on Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland Preserved in the Public Record Office of Ireland. Edward I. Part 2. XXIII to XXV Years (London, 1914), p. 231.
  13. Mills, James, ed. Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls on Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland Preserved in the Public Record Office of Ireland. Edward I. Part 2. XXIII to XXV Years (London, 1914), pp 291-92.
  14. Mills, James, ed. Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls on Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland Preserved in the Public Record Office of Ireland. Edward I. Part 2. XXIII to XXV Years (London, 1914), p. 314.
  15. Mills, James, ed. Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls on Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland Preserved in the Public Record Office of Ireland. Edward I. Part 2. XXIII to XXV Years (London, 1914), p 359.
  16. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1307-1313 (London, 1894), p. 491.
  17. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898), p. 5.
  18. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898), p. 168.
  19. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898), p. 356.
  20. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898),p. 409.
  21. The printed source seems to have a 'u', not an 'n'.
  22. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898), p. 318.
  23. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898), p. 547.
  24. [Handcock, G.F., compil.; Fowler, R.C., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1313-1317 (London, 1898), pp. 519-20.
  25. [Stevenson, W.H., ed.; Woodruff, C.H., index.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Close Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1323–1327 (London, 1898), p. 10.
  26. Bateson, Mary, ed.; Stevenson, W.H., ed. & revis.; Stocks, J.E., ed. & revis.; Stocks, ed. & revis.; Creighton, Mandell, introd. Records of the Borough of Leicester: Being a Series of Extracts from the Archives of the Corporation of Leicester (London; Cambridge, 1899-1905), p. 379.
  27. [Black, J.G., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1324-1327 (London, 1904), p. 123.
  28. [Stevenson, W.H., ed.; Woodruff, C.H., index.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.] Calendar of the Close Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward II. A.D. 1323–1327 (London, 1898), p. 437.
  29. [Isaacson, R.F., ed.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, ed.] Calendar of the Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office [...] Edward III. A.D. 1330-1334 (London, 1893), p. 239.
  30. Hardy, W.J., ed.; Page, W., ed. A Calendar to the Feet of Fines for London & Middlesex, vol. I (London, 1899), p. 126, No. 253.
  31. [Isacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XII. A.D. 1361–1364 (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1912), p. 186.
  32. [Isacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XII. A.D. 1361–1364 (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1912), pp. 486-88.
  33. [Isacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XIII. A.D. 1364–1367 (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1912), p. 202.
  34. [Isacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XIII. A.D. 1364–1367 (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1912), p. 138.
  35. [Isacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XIII. A.D. 1364–1367 (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1912), p. 202.
  36. [Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XV. A.D. 1370–1374 (London; London and Cardiff; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1914), pp. 174-75.
  37. London.[Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XV. A.D. 1370–1374 (London; London and Cardiff; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1914), p. 342.
  38. [Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.; Dawes, M.C.B., index.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Edward III. Vol. XV. A.D. 1370–1374 (London; London and Cardiff; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1914), p. 491.
  39. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 9.
  40. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 14.
  41. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 14.
  42. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 287.
  43. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 288, and see 287.
  44. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 480.
  45. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 480.
  46. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 483.
  47. [Bland, A.E., compil.; Isaacson, Robert F., compil.; Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, introd.]. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, preserved in the Public Record Ofice. Henry VI. Vol. V. A.D. 1446–1452. (London; Edinburgh; Dublin, 1906), p. 490.
  48. Hanham, Alison, ed. Churchwardens' Accounts of Ashburton, 1479-1580 edited with an introduction by Alison Hanham (Devon and Cornwall Record Society, New series, vol. 15) (Torquay, 1970), p. 11.
  49. Hanham, Alison, ed. Churchwardens' Accounts of Ashburton, 1479-1580 edited with an introduction by Alison Hanham (Devon and Cornwall Record Society, New series, vol. 15) (Torquay, 1970), p. 14.