Jump to: navigation, search

1876 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (4)

Record
Date 1876
Topic Robin Hood Lane, Poplar, figures twice in a case where a man accused of theft was acquitted
Loading map...
Robin Hood Lane, Poplar.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-06-15. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-07-28.

Record

[23 Oct. 1876:]
Cross-examined by the Prisoner. You and I went to the theatre together on 20th September, I picked up a prostitute, we all three went to a beer-house, and then walked with her to the turning of Robin Hood Lane—I did not want to take her home—I did not say that I had got no money; I had money in my pocket—I did not leave my purse on the window ledge—I did not tell you to meet the prostitute next morning at the top of Robin Hood Lane—I said that I had to go to work at 7 a.m. on a tea ship—I had nothing to do with her, and did not want to see her again—I did not tell you to take your clothes and dispose of them for 10s., so that she could go home with me—I could not take anybody to my place.

SAMUEL CLARK. I live at 2, Brown's Road, Plaistow—I went home with the prosecutor when he missed his clothes—I went to public-house, found the prisoner, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. I did not give this evidence at Stratford on the 22nd, because I was not called—I paid a visit to you at the police-court—I did not say in the presence of an officer, that I knew nothing about the case, and was only saying what Baldock told me.

WALTER THOMAS BAKER. I am assistant to Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker, of West Ham—on 21st September, about 8.30 a.m., I took those things in pledge from the prisoner, and advanced 20s. on them—he gave the name of Griffiths, Brooks Read—I gave them to the constable on the 22nd.

WILLIAM MAJOR (Policeman). On 21st September, about 8.40, the prosecutor came to the station, and I went with him, to a public-house at Poplar, and found the prisoner, who said that he had pawned the clothes, and got them from Baldock.

The Prisoner's Statement before the Magistrate. "On Wednesday evening last me and the prisoner went to the Albion Theatre together; he there picked up with a prostitute; we waited there till it was all over and then went into a public-house and had some beer. He. then wanted to know if she would accompany him home for the night, she said she would not, because he had no money. He then said "I can get you some money in the morning, "but she would not go with him. He told her then to meet me at 9 o'clock next morning at the top of Robin Hood Lane, that I should take his things to pawn and take her 10s., so as she and her son could get some things to go and live with him.[1]

Source notes

IRHB has silently regularized the use of spaces before punctuation marks in the quotation and corrected the HTML text at Proceedings of the Old Bailey from the PDF of the original printed edition.

Lists

Sources

Also see


Notes