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1870 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (1)

Record
Date 1870
Topic Victims of theft at Pindar Place (Grays Inn Road)
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The Pindar of Wakefield (328 Grays Inn Road), now The Water Rats.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-01-16. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-11-01.

Record

[11 Jul. 1870:]
ALFRED FAYER. I am landlord of the Pindar of Wakefield, in Gray's Ion Road—I know the prisoner—I saw him on 25th May, between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, in my bar—he came in and called for some ale, and he then asked to have a 5l. note changed—he handed it to my barmaid, and she brought it in to me—this (produced) is the note—I took it, and went with it to the bar—there was another person with the prisoner—I asked if they wanted change for it—the prisoner said "Yes"—I then asked him to endorse it—pen and ink was handed to him, and he wrote a name and address on the back—it has been partly stamped out at the back—it was "James" something; but what the name was I can't remember, "No. 4, Bird Street"—I saw the prisoner write it—knowing Bird Street I asked him about a man named Russell, who lived there; but he did not know him—I expressed my surprise at his not knowing him—he made some excuse that satisfied me—I gave him the change in gold—there might have been 10s. in silver, and they went away, after drinking what they had called for—no it morning I paid away the note to Mr. Clayton, the gas collector.

[...]

SUSAN COULSON. I am barmaid at the Pindar of Wakefield public-house—on Wednesday, 25th May, between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, the prisoner came to our house with another young man—he asked for some ale, and gave me a 5l. note, which I took into the parlour to Mr. Fayer, and he came out and gave him change, and the prisoner wrote a name and address on the back—I saw him write it—the address was "4, Bird Street"—he received the change and went away.

[...]

JOHN MULVANT. I am an inspector of the detective police—I was instructed to watch at the Midland Station, St. Pancras—on Monday, 30th May, I saw the prisoner come on to the platform, about 10.10, and try the mail-room door—he did not open it, it was locked—I had seen Folkard and the prisoner's brother, Richard, on the platform, some short time before that—Folkard had collected the bags in the usual course, taken them to the mail-room, locked them up, and gone away—after the prisoner tried the door he left the station—Folkard afterwards came to the station again, a few minutes before 11 o'clock, with the bags from the Great Northern Railway—he collected the bags from the up mail train at 11 o'clock, gave them to the mail driver, and then went out of the station, along the Euston Road, to the Victoria public-house, at the corner of York Road, where he joined the prisoner, his brother, and another man—that is about five minutes' walk from the Midland Station—I left them there—on the night of 2nd June I took Richard Bowman into custody—Folkard was taken by Sergeant Moon, on the morning of the 3rd, on another charge—on the morning of the 3rd I went to the prisoner's lodging, Julia Cottage, Marlborough Road, Dalston—he was in bed—his sister brought him down to me—I asked if he knew a person named Folkard—he said he did—I asked when he saw him last—he said "Last Monday," that he was at the railway station with him, and also at the Victoria public-house—that was Monday, the 30th, the day to which I have been referring—I asked him to allow me to look in his room—he did so—I found nothing—on Thursday, 9th June, I again went to his lodging—he was in bed—he was called down, and I said "You know me, I am an officer; I am going to ask you some questions; you need not answer them unless you please; were you in a public-house in the Gray's Inn Road on last night fortnight?—he said "What public-house? '—I said "The Pindar of Wakefield"—he said "I don't know such a house"—I said it was a house not far from the coffee-house in which you and your brother very often slept, in the Gray's Inn Road—he said "I don't know anything about it"—I said "A 5l. note was changed in that house, on that evening"—he said "I know nothing about it"—I said "Were you in any public-house in the Gray's Inn Road on that evening?—he said "No"—I said "Where were you on that evening?"—he said "I can't remember"—I then said "Have you any objection to go with me to the <keyword>Pindar of Wakefield<keyword>?"—he said "No, I have not, I will go with you"—we went in a cab to the corner of Swinton Street; we got out, and when about thirty yards distant, I said, pointing to the house, "That is the house I mean"—he said "Oh, I know that house very well, I have often been there with Folkard"—on going in Mr. Payer and the barmaid were both at the bar—I said to Mr. Fayer "You remember that affair I was speaking to you about the other night? '—he said "Yes"—I said "Do you know this young man?"—he said "Yes, that is the man; do you remember my asking you a question about Bird Street?—the prisoner said "No, I don't"—Mr. Fayer said "Why, you endorsed the note"—he said "No, I know nothing about it"—Mr. Fayer then said to his barmaid "Do you know him?"—she said "Yes, that is the man that gave me the note"—I said to the prisoner "You hear what they say now?"—he said "Yes, I do; but it is a mistake"—I then said to Miss Coulson "You are positive this is the man?"—she said "Yes, I knew him the moment he came into the house"—I then told him he would have to go with me to Bow Street, and I took him into custody—on searching him I found two duplicates, one for a gold Albert, pledged on 17th May, for 15s., and another for a silver watch, on 18th May, for 12s.[1]

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IRHB has silently regularized the use of spaces before punctuation marks in the quotation and corrected the HTML text at Proceedings of the Old Bailey from the PDF of the original printed edition.

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