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1825 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey (2)

Record
Date 1825
Topic Thief interrogated near Pindar of Wakefield Alley (Grays Inn Road)
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The Pindar of Wakefield (328 Grays Inn Road), now The Water Rats.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-01-16. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-07-28.

Record

[30 Jun. 1825:]
ALEXANDER MITCHEL. I am a Thames-police officer. I went on board the barge Wellington on the 1st of June, with Mr. Gally's foreman and another man; she was shifted to the outside of the barges, ready to go away — I saw Hammerton on board, and asked if he was the master of the barge — he said he was; I had not then told him what I came about. I asked what he had got in the barge — he said empty sacks; I asked if all the malt was delivered — he said it was: I then proceeded to turn over a number of empty sacks, which laid in a bulk in the barge; while I was doing that, he said "There are eight sacks of malt under that tarpauling;" I said "You just now told me all your malt was delivered — how came you to tell me that?" he said he did not know; I asked him who it belonged to — he said he did not know. I then turned the tarpauling on one side, and under seven or eight other tarpaulings, I found eight sacks of malt, most of them marked Richard Gally, Kingston. I think one of them was different, but they were all in the name of Gally. I then took him and the malt, on board the police ship. I asked his name, his employer's name, and the barge's name; he said it was enough for him to be answerable for what he had done himself — that there were only four sacks of this malt that belonged to him, and for them he had paid the man who carried it out of the barge to the cart, to go to the brew-house, and the other four sacks were brought on board by Dick Missen, out of Downe's barge, that morning, and they had shifted them out of Downe's sacks into Gally's; Missen has absconded, and the other two men who assisted to carry the malt out of the barge. I then went to Battle-bridge, and found Gibbons in the Pindar of Wakefield, public-house. I told him he was wanted to go to the brewhouse about some malt being short: I put him in a chaise, and took him to the ship, where Hammerton was, and I heard Green, my brother officer, ask Hammerton, if that was the man he had given the sovereign to for the malt, and he said it was - Gibbons denied it, and Hammerton said "It is useless denying it, the boy has told all about it, and you may as well tell the truth." Gibbons then said he had received a sovereign, but he did not know what Hammerton gave it him for.

CHARLES GREEN. I am an officer. I went with Mitchel to the Pindar of Wakefield — I got Gibbons out; I asked if he had been drawing malt for Coombe and Co. — he said he had; we went down to where Hammerton was, and there I heard the conversation which has been related: Gibbons said he had received the sovereign, but did not know what it was for — he said "It is a bad job but we must make the best of it."[1]

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IRHB has silently regularized the use of spaces before punctuation marks in the quotation and corrected the HTML text at Proceedings of the Old Bailey from the PDF of the original printed edition.

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