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1732 - Proceedings of the Old Bailey

Record
Date 1732
Topic Criminals sleep at the Pindar of Wakefield (Grays Inn Road)
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The Pindar of Wakefield (328 Grays Inn Road), now The Water Rats.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-01-16. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-06-21.

Record

[5 Jul. 1732:]
Buck. He was senseless with the Blows and Wounds: This is the Hat, and Plumridge took his Wig to the best of my Remembrance, tho' the Prisoner since told me, that he took it himself. We stript his Coat off, and the Prisoner bid me put it on and wear it, which I did; but first they knock'd him down, and would have murder'd him if I had not begg'd his Life. How can ye serve a Man so villainously? says I, sure you will not be such vile Men as to kill him! For God's Sake spare his Life. And so as they were going I listed him up, and bid him run for his Life; upon which Plumridge and the Prisoner turn'd back to kill me, but I made 'em easy. This is the Coat, and here are the 2 Cuts in the Back. Then we came on foot to Newgate-street, and there we took Coach between 12 and 1 in the Morning, and drove to Mr. Pember's, at the Pindar of Wake-field, where we all three went to bed together. Pember married one of my Sisters. Next Day we went to the Two Brewers by the Church in Old Bedlam, where we spent most of the Money, and at Night I and Plumridge went to Cow-Cross, where we pawn'd the Coat for 7 s. and from thence to Ralph Dobson's in the Old Bailey, where we met the Prisoner, and spent the Night together. I voluntarily surrender'd myself to Justice Robe the same Week (but I forget the Day) and gave Information against the Prisoner, who was taken immediately; then I went, and 3 Men with me, to see for Plumridge in Old Bedlam, but he was gone before we came; and after that I went by myself to New Prison [...]
Buck. One of my Sisters kept a Brandy shop, and t'other kept an Alehouse at the Pindar of Wakefield, but they have both met with Losses, and so have left off Trade.
Ralph Dobson. I live in the Old Baily, I am a Cooper by Trade, and sell Liquors and Earthen-ware, Buck, and Plumridge, and the Prisoner were drinking together at my House last Monday was a Fortnight, between 11 and 12 at Night; they had a Bottle of Dorcheste Beer, and a Bottle of Perry.
William Pomber. I lately kept the B[???] Tree Alehouse at the Pindar of Wakefield, but have since left it. On Monday the 19th of April, about one in the Morning, Buck, and Plumridge, and the Prisoner came in a Coach to my Door, and knock'd me up; I told 'em I had no Fire, nor Candle in the House; they said they were very dry; says I to Buck, You know the way into the Cellar, fetch up some bottle Ale; so he went down, and brought up 3 Bottles. I groped about for a Mug, but not finding it readily, they drank out of the Bottle; then they all 3 went to the Pump to wash themselves; I went up to Bed, and they follow'd me; my Wife was not with me, and so we lay all together, for it was a very large Bed. I got up at 5, and opening the Window-shutter, saw their Cloaths which lay on the Bed, and their Linen were very bloody: Plumridge call'd for some Water, and a Towel, which I fetch'd, and he began to wash one of the Coats, which was more bloody than the rest; says I you'll spoil your Coat, you had better do it with a dry Brush; he desir'd me to help him to one, which I did, and then he began to rub the Blood off his own Coat, for he said the other was Buck's, and when he had done, the Prisoner took the Brush, and clean'd his Coat [...][1]

Source notes

IRHB has silently regularized the use of spaces before punctuation marks in the quotation, corrected the HTML text at Proceedings of the Old Bailey from the PDF of the original printed edition and replaced black letter with italic type in the names of the defendants. IRHB's ellipses.

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