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1354 - London sheriff John Little

Record
Date 1354
Topic Sherif John Litle figures in deed.
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London.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-11-19. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2018-11-19.

Record

[20 Aug. 1354:]
Enrolment of release by William de Norhtoft of the county of Essex to John Roce, citizen and fishmonger of London, of all his right and claim in that tenement with cellar, upper chamber and garden and its appurtenances, which John holds of his demise situate in St. Botolf's Lane and in the parish of St. George near Estchep, London, to wit, between the tenement of Master Roger de la Bere on the north and the tenement which belonged to John Youn on the south, and the tenement of Michael de Ifeld on the east and the highway on the west. Adam Fraunceys, then mayor of London, John Litle and William atte Welde, then sheriffs of that city, Ralph de Lenne, then alderman of the ward. Witnesses: Richard de Evre, Andrew Pikeman, Giles Pikeman, Robert White, Guy Lambyn, Thomas de Santon, clerk. Dated London, Thursday after the Assumption, 28 Edward III.
Memorandum that William came into the chancery at Westminster on the said Thursday and acknowledged the preceding deed. [1]

Source notes

Membrane 12d of the Close Roll for 28 Edward III. Italics as in printed source. The preceding entry on the roll concerns a related transaction:

Enrolment of indenture made between William Nortoft of the county of Essex and John Roce, citizen and fishmonger of London, witnessing that William has demised at ferm to John all that tenement with cellars, upper chambers, and garden adjacent and other appurtenances situate in St. Botolf's Lane in the parish of St. George, London, to wit, between the tenement of Master Roger de la Bere on the north and the tenement which belonged to John Yon on the south, to hold from Midsummer 27 Edward III until the end of seven years following, rendering to William 4 marks yearly at the terms usual in the city of London, of which seven years William acknowledges the receipt from John for the first three years, and if the rent be in arrear in whole or in part William may enter the said tenement and distrain there until he is satisfied, and John will maintain the tenement from wind aad rain during the said term. Witnesses: John de Mockyng, Andrew Pikman, Robert Haunsard, Giles Pikman. Dated London, the said day.
Memorandum that the said parties came into the chancery at Westminster on 20 August and acknowledged the preceding deed.[2]

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